Archives par mot-clé : gender

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization

 

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization

November 2013

Volume 20, Issue 6

Les articles:

Negotiating Gender Relations: Muslim Women and Formal Employment in Pakistan’s Rural Development Sector (pages 599–615)

Julia Grünenfelder

 

Lawyers’ Professional Careers: Increasing Women’s Inclusion in the Partnership of Law Firms (pages 616–631)

Ashly H. Pinnington and Jörgen Sandberg

 

Fathers at Work: A Ghost in the Organizational Machine (pages 632–646)

Simon B. Burnett, Caroline J. Gatrell, Cary. L. Cooper and Paul Sparrow

 

Balls Enough: Manliness and Legitimated Violence in Hell’s Kitchen (pages 647–663)

Gabriella Nilsson

 

‘Heroes and Matriarchs’: Working-Class Femininities, Violence and Door Supervision Work (pages 664–677)

Bridgette Rickett and Andrew Roman

 

Decision-Making Factors within Paternity and Parental Leaves: Why Spanish Fathers Take Time Off from Work (pages 678–691)

Pedro Romero-Balsas, Dafne Muntanyola-Saura and Jesús Rogero-García

 

Customer First and Customer Sexual Harassment: Some Evidence from the Taiwan Life Insurance Industry (pages 692–708)

Tseng Lu-Ming

 

The Last Stitch in the Quilt (pages 709–719)

Elena Bendien

 

Location, Vocation, Location? Spatial Entrapment among Women in Dual Career Households (pages 720–736)

Dan Wheatley

 

‘Dirty Work?’ Gender, Race and the Union in Industrial Cleaning (pages 737–751)

Urvashi Soni-Sinha and Charlotte A.B. Yates

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Le genre in situ: La prison

Le genre in situ: La prison

 Signs, Prison

Le numéro actuel de la revue Signs est consacré aux femmes, genre, et prison dans la nation et le monde.

« Women, Gender, and Prison: National and Global Perspectives »

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 1, Autumn 2013

 Les articles:

Women in Prison: Victims or Resisters? Representations of Agency in Women’s Prisons in Greece(pp. 1-26)

Andriani Fili

 

A Cell of Their Own: The Incarceration of Women in Late Medieval Italy(pp. 27-51)

Guy Geltner

 

“Like I Was a Man”: Chain Gangs, Gender, and the Domestic Carceral Sphere in Jim Crow Georgia(pp. 53-77)

Sarah Haley

 

Gendered Carceral Regimes in Sri Lanka: Colonial Laws, Postcolonial Practices, and the Social Control of Sex Workers(pp. 79-103)

Jody Miller and Kristin Carbone-Lopez

 

Motherhood as Punishment: The Case of Parenting in Prison(pp. 105-130)

Lynne Haney

 

Emotions behind Bars: The Regulation of Mothering in Argentine Jails(pp. 131-149)

Constanza Tabbush and María Florencia Gentile

 

Enforcing Gender: The Constitution of Sex and Gender in Prison Regimes(pp. 151-175)

Sarah Pemberton

 

Gendering Transnational Criminality: The Case of Women’s Imprisonment in Peru(pp. 177-195)

Camille Boutron and Chloé Constant

 

Sexual Necropolitics and Prison Rape Elimination(pp. 197-220)

Jessi Lee Jackson

 

“Staff Here Let You Get Down”: The Cultivation and Co-optation of Violence in a California Juvenile Detention Center(pp. 221-241)

Jerry Flores

 

Women and the Criminalization of Poverty: Perspectives from Sierra Leone(pp. 243-264)

Sabrina Mahtani

 

Institutional Disparities: Considerations of Gender in the Commutation Process for Incarcerated Women(pp. 265-289)

Carol Jacobsen and Lora Bex Lempert

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Numéro de la revue Signs consacré à l’intersectionalité

Numéro de la revue Signs consacré à l’intersectionalité

Signs, Vol. 38, No. 4, Summer 2013

Published by: The University of Chicago Press

Issue Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/669610

 

Special Issue:

Intersectionality: Theorizing Power, Empowering Theory
Edited by Sumi Cho, Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, and Leslie McCall

 

Toward a Field of Intersectionality Studies: Theory, Applications, and Praxis(pp. 785-810)

Sumi Cho, Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, and Leslie McCall

 

Colorblind Intersectionality(pp. 811-845)

Devon W. Carbado

 

From Patriarchy to Intersectionality: A Transnational Feminist Assessment of How Far We’ve Really Come(pp. 847-867)

Vrushali Patil

 

Unsafe Travel: Experiencing Intersectionality and Feminist Displacements(pp. 869-892)

Gail Lewis

 

Intersectional and Cross-Movement Politics and Policies: Reflections on Current Practices and Debates(pp. 893-915)

Mieke Verloo

 

Intersectionality as a Social Movement Strategy: Asian Immigrant Women Advocates(pp. 917-940)

Jennifer Jihye Chun, George Lipsitz, and Young Shin

 

Identity Categories as Potential Coalitions(pp. 941-965)

Anna Carastathis

Transnational Feminist Crossings: On Neoliberalism and Radical Critique(pp. 967-991)

Chandra Talpade Mohanty

 

To Tell the Truth and Not Get Trapped: Desire, Distance, and Intersectionality at the Scene of Argument(pp. 993-1017)

Barbara Tomlinson

 

Intersectionality as Method: A Note(pp. 1019-1030)

Catharine A. MacKinnon

 

Intersectional Resistance and Law Reform(pp. 1031-1055)

Dean Spade

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Gender, Work, and Organization, 8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference

Appel à communications:

 

Gender, Work and Organization

8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference

24th – 26th June, 2014, Keele University, UK

 

As a central theme in social science research in the field of work and organisation, the study of gender has achieved contemporary significance beyond the confines of early discussions of women at work. Launched in 1994, Gender, Work and Organization was the first journal to provide an arena dedicated to debate and analysis of gender relations, the organisation of gender and the gendering of organisations. The Gender, Work and Organization conference provides an international forum for debate and analysis of a variety of issues in relation to gender studies. The 2012 conference at Keele University attracted approximately 380 international scholars from over 30 nations. The Conference will be held at Keele University, Staffordshire, in Central England, the UK’s largest integrated campus university.

Visit Keele Hall Info pdf at: http://www.keele-conference.com/2/keele-hall The University occupies a 617 acre campus site with Grade II registration by English Heritage and has good road and rail access. Many architectural and landscape features dating from the 19th century are of regional significance. International travellers are served by Manchester and Birmingham airports. On campus accommodation caters for up to 100,000 visitors per year in day and residential conferences.

 

Conference Organisers: Deborah Kerfoot (Keele University, UK) d.kerfoot@keele.ac.uk

Ida Sabelis (Vrije University, NETHERLANDS)

Conference Administrator Nicola Nixon at: gwo@keele.ac.uk

International travellers are served by Manchester and Birmingham airports. On campus accommodation caters for up to 100,000 visitors per year in day and residential conferences.

Travel and transport: http://www.keele-conference.com/21/directions

Conference venue: http://www.keele-conference.com/2/keele-hall

University campus information: http://www.keele-conference.com/21/directions (follow pdf link)

Conference package fee: booking form for GWO2014 (conference, meals and 2 nights en-suite accommodation) and discounted `early-bird’ rate, forthcoming on `News and Announcements’ section of our website http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-0432

Sample accommodation information: http://www.keele-conference.com/5/accommodation and

http://www.keele-conference.com/125/accommodation-picture-gallery

 

Submit your abstract direct to one of the streams listed here. Most are due November 1, 2013. (http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/58518/GWO2014_Call_for_abstracts_all%20streams_1.pdf)

 

 

We look forward to welcoming you in person to GWO2014!

Deborah Kerfoot and Ida Sabelis,

Gender, Work & Organization.

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro du Journal of Women’s History

Sortie du dernier numéro du Journal of Women’s History

 

Volume 25, Number 2, Summer 2013

 

Articles

Guest Editorial Note: Women’s Autobiography in South Asia and the Middle East

Marilyn Booth

 

Miracles for the Marginal?: Gender and Agency in a Nineteenth-Century Autobiographical Fragment

Anshu Malhotra

 

Locating Women’s Autobiographical Writing in Colonial Egypt

Marilyn Booth

 

Life/History/Archive: Identifying Autobiographical Writing by Muslim Women in South Asia

Siobhan Lambert-Hurley

 

Identities in Motion: Reading Two Ottoman Travel Narratives as Life Writing

Roberta Micallef

 

Writing the Personal: The Evolution of Assia Djebar’s Autobiographical Project from L’Amour, La Fantasia to Nulle Part Dans La Maison de Mon Père

Mildred Mortimer

 

Iranian Women’s Life Narratives

Farzaneh Milani

 

Roundtable on Autobiographical Narrative

Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Towards a Feminist Intellectual History

Sadaf Jaffer

 

Theorizing Oral History as Autobiography: A Look at the Narrative of a Woman Revolutionary in Egypt

Margot Badran

 

Autobiography and Muslim Women’s Lives

Amina Yaqin

 

“An Assemblage/Before Me”: Autobiography as Archive

Antoinette Burton

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue Gender & Society

Sortie du dernier numéro du Gender & Society:

 title page

August 2013; 27 (4)

Hae Yeon Choo

The Cost of Rights: Migrant Women, Feminist Advocacy, and Gendered Morality in South Korea

 

Veronica Montes

The Role of Emotions in the Construction of Masculinity: Guatemalan Migrant Men, Transnational Migration, and Family Relations

 

Yinni Peng and Odalia M. H. Wong

Diversified Transnational Mothering via Telecommunication: Intensive, Collaborative, and Passive

 

Daisy Deomampo

Gendered Geographies of Reproductive Tourism

 

Leslie K. Wang

Unequal Logics of Care: Gender, Globalization, and Volunteer Work of Expatriate Wives in China

 

Erynn Masi De Casanova

Embodied Inequality: The Experience of Domestic Work in Urban Ecuador

 

Book Reviews

Tola Olu Pearce

Book Review: Sexuality and Gender Politics in Mozambique: Rethinking Gender in Africa by Signe Arnfred

 

Luz María Gordillo

Book Review: Intimate Migrations: Gender, Family, and Illegality Among Transnational Mexicans by Deborah A. Boehm

 

Faezeh Bahreini

Book Review: Between Feminism and Orthodox Judaism: Resistance, Identity, and Religious Change in Israel by Yael Israel-Cohen

 

Jill Bystydzienski

Book Review: Gender and Science: Studies across Cultures by Neelam Kumar

 

Angelika Von Wahl

Book Review: Gender–Class Equality in Political Economies by Lynn Prince Cooke

 

Kathryn D. Linnenberg

Book Review: For the Family?: How Class and Gender Shape Women’s Work by Sarah Damaske

 

Karin A. Martin

Book Review: The Gender Trap: Parents and the Pitfalls of Raising Boys and Girls by Emily W. Kane

 

Rebecca G. Adams

Book Review: Odd Couples: Friendships at the Intersection of Gender and Sexual Orientation by Anna Muraco

 

Jennifer L. Pierce

Book Review: Paid to Party: Working Time and Emotion in Direct Sales by Jamie L. Mullaney and Janet Hinson Shope

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à Articles: Lilith: A Feminist History Journal

Appel à Articles (Call for Papers)

Lilith: A Feminist History Journal

http://www.lilithjournal.org.au/?page_id=53

Le journal Lilith encourage spécialement les soumissions des doctorant-e-s internationaux en l’histoire du genre, l’histoire des femmes, et l’histoire des féminismes.

“The recently revived Lilith: A Feminist History Journal is seeking submissions for our next issue.

First published in 1984, Lilith is a peer-reviewed journal which publishes articles and reviews in all areas of women’s, feminist and gender history (not limited to Australia). It is a valuable forum for both new and established scholars in the field. We particularly encourage submissions from Australian and international postgraduate students and early career researchers.

Submissions for the 2014 issue must be received by 1 September 2013.”

Enquiries to: lilithjournal@gmail.com

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue Gender & Society:

Sortie du dernier numéro du Gender & Society:

Gender & Society

http://gas.sagepub.com/content/current

Articles:

Jocelyn A. Hollander

“I Demand More of People”: Accountability, Interaction, and Gender Change

 

Rachel E. Dwyer, Randy Hodson, and Laura McCloud

Gender, Debt, and Dropping Out of College

 

Vicki Schull, Sally Shaw, and Lisa A. Kihl

“If A Woman Came In … She Would Have Been Eaten Up Alive”: Analyzing Gendered Political Processes in the Search for an Athletic Director

 

Thomas J. Linneman

Gender in Jeopardy!: Intonation Variation on a Television Game Show

 

Book Review Symposium:

Denise Copelton and Joan Spade

Conversations: A Symposium on Stephanie Coontz’s A Strange Stirring

 

Katja M. Guenther

Rethinking a Feminist Classic: Reflections on Coontz’s A Strange Stirring

 

Benita Roth

Real Housewives with Real Problems?

 

Nancy Whittier

Everyday Readers and Social Movements: Considering the Impact of The Feminine Mystique

 

Stephanie Coontz

A Response to Reviewers

 

Book Reviews:

Tristan S. Bridges

Book Review: Nurturing Dads: Social Initiatives for Contemporary Fatherhood

 

Michael W. Yarbrough

Book Review: Unhitched: Love, Marriage, and Family Values from West Hollywood to Western China

 

Sarah Jane Brubaker

Book Review: Poverty, Battered Women, and Work in U.S. Policy

 

 

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Prochaine séance du séminaire GCP, le 8 février 2013: “Les espaces de loisirs” avec Alexandra Ferreira

La prochaine séance du séminaire aura lieu le 8 février, 16h-18h, à l’Université Paris I Panthéon Sorbonne, en salle Picard (esc. C, 3e étage). Alexandra Ferreira, Doctorante en sciences de l’éducation à l’Université Paris 13 Villetaneuse, viendra discuter de sa recherche.

Son intervention est intitulée: “Le centre de loisirs élémentaire parisien comme lieu d’apprentissage du genre. Enjeux des mixités (sexuelle, générationnelle, sociale)”.

Pour préparer notre séance, un texte de notre intervenante « Temporalités et apprentissages de genre en centre de loisirs » et plusieurs suggestions bibliographiques: Quelques éléments bibliographiques autour des centre de loisirs, laboratoires du genre

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communication: Social Science History Association Conference: “Organizing Powers”

Appel à communication: Social Science History Association Conference:

 “Organizing Powers”

Chicago, IL, USA

 November 21-24, 2013

Submission Deadline: 15 February 2013

Des organisatrices du réseau “Women, Gender, and Sexuality”:

“Please consider proposing panels that fit under the broad umbrella of our network women, gender & sexuality.  If you like more specific guidance, the general topic of the conference is « organizing powers » (see http://www.ssha.org/pdfs/SSHA_2013_CFP.pdf). In addition, topics raised at this year’s network meeting included:

Re-evaluating the sexual revolution from women, gender and sexuality perspectives; The organizing power of affect; The organizing power of color; The organizing powers of feminisms; Re-evaluating the socio-cultural effects of feminisms; Gendering and sexualization as structuring instruments of power; The relationship between feminism and revolution; Gender and labor organizing; Women and consumer activism; The Men’s movement; Re-organizing power relations; Gender organizing prison; LGBT, marriage: re-organizing power? Gender-segregation as organizing power; The relationship between household and state.

These are suggestions only – we are happy to consider all themes that fit within our network.

The deadline for submissions is February 15, 2013!  For instructions on how to upload panel and individual paper proposals please go to: http://www.ssha.org/conference-submission.”

SSHA

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro du Journal of Women’s History: “Human Rights, Global Conferences, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms”

Sortie du dernier numéro du Journal of Women’s History: “Human Rights, Global Conferences, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms”

Journal of Women's History Cover

Un extrait de l’introduction de  Jean H. Quataert et Benita Roth:

From: Journal of Women’s History
Volume 24, Number 4, Winter 2012
pp. 11-23 | 10.1353/jowh.2012.0038

 

“This note introduces our special issue on « Human Rights, Global Conferences, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms. » In it we try to capture part of the contentious histories of feminist activism unfolding in the period after World War II. We focus specifically on the meanings for feminist thought and action worldwide of the UN sponsored world conferences on women and related international gatherings. Prodded by international and national women’s non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and facilitated through the UN’s Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), the United Nations General Assembly declared 1975 « International Women’s Year » (IWY) and named 1975-1985 as the « Decade for Women. » The UN sponsored three large international conferences beginning with Mexico City (1975), followed by Copenhagen (1980), and Nairobi (1985); these gatherings generated so much momentum that a Fourth Women’s World Conference was held in Beijing in 1995. Other UN conferences, including the World Conference Against Racism (WCAR) in Durban, South Africa in September 2001, also featured in this issue, allowed feminist antiracist activists around the globe to come together to discuss understandings of the intersections of gender and racial oppression.

These conferences took place against the backdrop of a number of formative geopolitical developments: Cold War tensions and their subsequent easing after 1989; decolonization struggles and emerging nations’ insistent drive for equitable economic development amid the continuing inequalities of the global economic and political order; the rise of neo-liberal economic agendas; women’s increased participation globally in the formal labor sector; transnational organizing for lesbian and gay rights; and a concomitant, significant rise by the mid-1990s of conservative religious and fundamentalist groups around the world. These geopolitical and cultural factors sometimes sustained and sometimes constrained the ability of diverse feminist and women’s activists to form alliances, set new international and national agendas, and see to their implementation on the ground.

Until very recently, much of what has appeared about the UN conferences in journal literature has been in the form of reports on participants’ experiences nearly exclusively in women’s studies journals. Since 1996, it has mainly been feminist sociologists and political scientists charting the effects of the UN conferences on feminist and women’s organizing around the globe. There also is a vibrant literature assessing the impact of women’s world conferences on feminist contributions to development discourses, particularly those efforts challenging the neo-liberal assumptions that drive the giving of mainstream development aid. These debates stress ongoing unequal macro-economic contexts.

The topic of the UN meetings, with a few exceptions, has been left largely unexamined in women’s history despite its undeniable importance for shaping the vibrant new patterns of transnational advocacy networks that emerged during the Decade. The same time frame saw a huge growth of feminist NGOs worldwide; the invention of innovative gatherings like the World Social Forums, which feature impressive participation by feminist activists; and the creation of UN People’s Forums, which gave voice and visibility to NGOs as well as to local leaders and activists generally marginal to governmental authority and power. Strikingly, however, the Journal of Women’s History paid scant scholarly attention to these conferences. One short report by Peggy Simpson, « Beijing in Perspective, » appeared in the Spring 1996 issue; Simpson was an acclaimed Associated Press journalist whose personal experiences are part of the larger narrative presented here. In 1997, the JWH published Wang Zheng’s article « Maoism, Feminism, and the UN Conference on Women: Women’s Studies Research in Contemporary China. » The relative neglect by historians of the more recent interface of global and local feminist organizing lies, perhaps, in the challenges for historical research of engaging contemporary themes and issues. The growing interest among women’s historians in human rights histories and comparative studies in women’s movements thus reflects a major conceptual shift, which promises a turn to transnational methodologies, interregional connections, and global historical perspectives. As we hope to show through the articles in this issue, the entry provided…”

 

The articles:

Guest Editorial Note: Human Rights, Global Conferences, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms

Jean H. Quataert, Benita Roth

 

Empires of Information: Media Strategies for the 1975 International Women’s Year

Jocelyn Olcott

 

Rethinking State Socialist Mass Women’s Organizations: The Committee of the Bulgarian Women’s Movement and the United Nations Decade for Women, 1975-1985

Kristen Ghodsee

 

Negotiating Religious and Women’s Identities: Catholic Women at the UN World Conferences, 1975-1995

Agnès Desmazières

 

Transnational Feminism and Contextualized Intersectionality at the 2001 World Conference Against Racism

Sylvanna M. Falcón

 

Global Gender Policy in the 1990s: Incorporating the « Vital Voices » of Women

Karen Garner

 

Indian Women Activists and Transnational Feminism over the Twentieth Century

Nandini Deo

 

UN Activist Forum

Historians Meet Activists at the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, June 2011

Kathryn Kish Sklar, Thomas Dublin

 

Unfinished Agenda

Mildred Emory Persinger

 

Making History Word by Word

Arvonne S. Fraser

 

Passion: Driving the Feminist Movement Forward

Devaki Jain

 

Sustaining Advocacy for Women’s Empowerment for Four Decades

Rounaq Jahan

 

Opening Doors for Feminism: UN World Conferences on Women

Charlotte Bunch

 

Book Reviews

« Stay Involved »: Transnational Feminist Advocacy and Women’s Human Rights

Helen Laville

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

« New Books in Gender Studies »

Le site vous propose les discussions autour des nouveaux livres en études du genre avec leurs auteurs. Pour chaque étude, on y trouve un résumé avec l’enregistrement de l’entretien.

Bonne écoute!

  http://newbooksingenderstudies.com/

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel de Communications, Berkshire Conference on Women’s History: Histories on the Edge/Histoires sur la brèche

 APPEL A COMMUNICATIONS

«Berkshire Conference on Women’s History»
Histories on the Edge/Histoires sur la brèche

Toronto: du 22 au 25 mai 2014  

Envoi des propositions: avant le 15 janvier 2013

http://berksconference.org/meetings/reminder-and-submission-site-for-2014-big-berks-is-up-and-running/

Cliquez ici pour accéder au Site des soumissions!

La description du site:

La seizième «Berkshire Conference on Women’s History» se tiendra à Toronto du 22 au 25 mai 2014. L’Université de Toronto accueillera la première «Big Berks» canadienne en collaboration avec des unités et universités co-marraines de Toronto et de l’ensemble du Canada.

Notre thème principal, Histories on the Edge/Histoires sur la brèche, illustre l’internationalisation croissante de la «Berkshire Conference». Il reconnaît également la précarité d’un monde où des millions de personnes marginalisées exigent des changements et où des intellectuelles et des intellectuels innovateurs créent des brèches et tissent des liens à l’intérieur comme à l’extérieur du monde universitaire. Le congrès organisé au Canada entend susciter un engagement afin de multiplier les brèches conceptuelles, en affinant, décentrant et décolonisant les histoires. Les brèches ont un caractère spatial – frontières impénétrables, enveloppes étouffantes ou protectrices, et points d’entrée fluides. Elles ont aussi une dimension temporelle, évoquant également la créativité et l’avant-garde. Ce concept suggère en outre un enchevêtrement de confrontations brutales, de conflits déchirants mais aussi d’échanges intimes. Il évoque les espaces alternatifs que se sont construits les personnes et populations «marginalisées» ainsi que les efforts déployés pour créer un espace commun où bâtir des histoires à caractère oppositionnel.

État-nation façonné par des récits historiques impérialistes et sa propre dynamique colonialiste, le Canada est lui-même en marge d’un empire américain très puissant, bien que peut-être en déclin. Comme d’autres sociétés investies par les Blancs, c’est un État colonial fondé sur la dépossession de Premières nations, sur une citoyenneté blanche aux marges policées et sur l’imposition de modèles patriarcaux d’assimilation. Son histoire s’est néanmoins déployée de façon très diverse selon le temps et l’espace et en suscitant une myriade de résistances. Vécue sur les marges de trois empires, la trajectoire historique du Canada comprend une première colonisation française, toujours vivante dans la présence francophone au pays, puis celle des Britanniques. Les signes distinctifs du pays comprennent aujourd’hui un système de santé public, le droit au mariage entre personnes de même sexe et un multiculturalisme officiel, même si contesté. La ville de Toronto, située en territoire Anishinabe, est un lieu créatif, cosmopolite et un foyer de contestation, qui est à la fois un «chez-soi» et un «ailleurs» pour bon nombre de ses résidentes et résidents. Quel meilleur endroit où examiner marges et brèches comme porteuses d’espoir, d’enthousiasme et de possibles, mais également de danger, de déplacement, de lutte et d’exil?

 Comme elles sont souvent les moteurs de changements, aussi lents, douloureux ou partiels soient-ils, nous sommes à l’affût d’histoires vécues «sur la brèche» partout et de toutes les époques. Nous voulons particulièrement faire place aux histoires des Caraïbes et de l’Amérique latine, de l’Asie et du Pacifique, de l’Afrique et du Moyen-Orient, ainsi qu’aux cultures indigènes, francophones et à celles des diasporas du monde entier. Nous faisons appel aux présentations qui font place à des corps et à des objets qui font brèche d’une manière ou d’une autre. Notre thème invite également les travaux qui soumettent à l’épreuve du queer les binarités de genre et de sexe. Comment historiciser l’émergence, les traces ou la persistance de constructions sociales de genre comme le «masculin» et le «féminin», ainsi que la performativité du genre, les pratiques sexuelles et les identifications sociales qui contestent les modes binaires du genre et de la sexualité?

Notre thème incite à la réflexion critique sur les nombreux modes d’opération du genre. Celui-ci présente son lot de brèches irrégulières: là où les sphères privées et publiques, et les masculinités et féminités, ont été définies et redéfinies; là où la classe, le genre, la race, l’ethnicité, la nation, la parenté, la sexualité et les in/capacités ont interagi. Le genre comme concept sera donc lui aussi sur la brèche: il faut le débattre et le passer au crible pour en exposer les usages, les contradictions, les atouts et les limites.

Ce thème central de la brèche tient compte de la théorie et de la praxis féministes qui favorisent des questionnements constants. Nous sommes en quête de travaux sur les formes du féminisme occidental et des féminismes non occidentaux et invitons à l’étude des féminismes dans le contexte sans cesse mouvant des rapports de pouvoir et des alignements internationaux. Le congrès interroge la possibilité d’une revitalisation de l’esprit critique du féminisme dominant. Devrions-nous, comme universitaires et quelle que soit notre position, chercher à ébranler le centre au profit de la marge? Affûter nos critiques d’un monde qui, aujourd’hui comme si souvent dans le passé, semble être au bord du gouffre?

Nous encourageons la mise sur pied de panels thématiques comparatifs ou transnationaux, même dans le cas de sous-thèmes plus régionaux. Un appel tout particulier est lancé aux chercheures et chercheurs dont les analyses traversent les siècles, les cultures, les lieux et les générations.

Les propositions seront approuvées par des sous-comités transnationaux de spécialistes de champs thématiques particuliers. Chaque proposition doit être rattachée à UN des sous-thèmes et être soumise par voie électronique. En rédigeant votre proposition à l’intention d’un des sous-comités, vous n’avez PAS à aborder chaque élément du thème en question. Veuillez aussi indiquer un deuxième choix de sous-thème, mais n’adressez pas votre proposition à plus d’un sous-comité

La préférence sera accordée aux discussions de tout sujet dépassant les frontières nationales, y compris pour les sous-thèmes régionaux, avec une considération spéciale pour les périodes pré-modernes (histoire ancienne, médiévale et Temps Modernes). Cependant, les articles individuels et les propositions consacrées à un seul pays ou à une seule région auront aussi droit à une entière considération. À titre de forum voué à encourager des recherches innovatrices et transdisciplinaires et des échanges transnationaux, nous faisons appel aux propositions d’étudiantes et d’étudiants diplômés, de spécialistes d’envergure internationale et autonomes, de cinéastes, de pédagogues, de conservatrices et de conservateurs, d’artistes, d’activistes, et nous voulons accueillir une riche gamme de perspectives.

 La personne qui soumet un article ou organise un panel, une table ronde ou un atelier est celle responsable de soumettre l’ensemble des éléments de cette proposition.

Types de séances (pour soumettre une proposition, vous vous identifierez comme « Auteur‑e » sur le site des soumissions)

 Articles individuels: Le fichier soumis doit inclure votre nom, le titre de l’article et un résumé d’au plus 250 mots. Veuillez soumettre également un bref c.v. (une demi-page).

Panels: Trois présentations d’articles (de 20 minutes chacune, ainsi que les noms d’un-e président-e et d’une commentatrice ou commentateur distinct. (Nous étudierons également les propositions de 2 ou 4 articles.) Le fichier soumis doit inclure le nom de l’auteur-e, le titre et un résumé de 250 mots pour chaque article, ainsi qu’un titre pour le panel, son résumé en 500 mots et le nom de l’organisatrice ou organisateur. Veuillez également soumettre un bref c.v. (une demi-page) pour chaque participant-e.

Tables rondes: De quatre à six présentatrices ou présentateurs et un-e président-e qui peut aussi agir comme modératrice ou modérateur. L’objectif visé est un échange de type collégial au sein du groupe et avec l’auditoire. Le fichier soumis doit inclure le titre de la table ronde, le nom de l’organisateur ou organisatrice, un résumé de 500 mots et la liste des participant-es, accompagnée d’une brève description de leur contribution à l’échange. Veuillez soumettre un bref c.v. (une demi-page) pour chaque participant-e.

Ateliers: De six à neuf articles pré-diffusés, ainsi que les noms d’un-e président-e et d’un-e discutant-e distinct-e. (Nous considérerons jusqu’à 10 articles.) Les articles devront être déposés avant le 30 avril 2014 et seront pré-diffusés par affichage sur un site Web accessible à toutes les personnes inscrites à la conférence. Le fichier soumis doit inclure le titre, le nom de l’auteur-e et un résumé de 250 mots pour chaque article, ainsi qu’un titre pour l’atelier, le nom de l’organisatrice ou organisateur et un résumé de 500 mots. Veuillez soumettre un bref c.v. (une demi-page) pour chaque participant-e. L’auditoire et les participant-es se livreront à une conversation thématique.)

Adressez votre soumission à UN des sous-thèmes (appelés « Sections » sur le site des soumissions)

*Frontières, rencontres, régions frontalières, zones de conflit et mémoire

*Empires, pays et bien commun

*Droit, enchevêtrements familiaux, tribunaux, criminalité et prisons

*Corps, santé, technologies médicales et sciences

*Histoires indigènes et mondes indigènes

*Caraïbes, Amérique latine et mondes afro/francophones

*Asie, circuits transnationaux et diasporas mondiales

*Économies, environnements, travail et consommation

*Sexualités, genres/LGBTIQ2 et intimités

*Politiques, religions/croyances et féminismes

*Cultures visuelles, matérielles et médiatiques: imprimé, image, objet, son, performance

Cliquez ici pour accéder au Site des soumissions!

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Women’s Histories: The Local and the Global

Appel à communications

The 22nd Conference of the
Women’s History Network
will be held at
Sheffield Hallam University
August 29 – September 1, 2013

Women’s Histories: The Local and the Global

In association with the International Federation for Research in Women’s History (IFRWH)

http://www.womenshistorynetwork.org/annualconf.html

De l’annonce:

Call for papers: Deadline for abstracts 31 October 2012

This international conference will explore the history of women worldwide, from archaic to contemporary periods. Engaging with the recent global and transnational turns in historical scholarship, it will examine the ways in which histories of women can draw on and reshape these approaches to understanding the past. It will focus on developing gendered histories of globalisation that explore the complex interplay between the local and the global, and on exploring the relationship between nation-based traditions of women’s history writing and transnational approaches which examine connections and comparisons between women’s lives in different localities. Key questions to be addressed are:

How can womens histories reshape our understanding of the relationship between the local and the global?

What implications does a transnational framework of analysis have for nation-based traditions of writing womens history?

Keynote speakers will include: Mrinalini Sinha, Alice Freeman Palmer Professor of History, University of Michigan; Catherine Hall, Professor of Modern British Social and Cultural History, University College London.

Strand themes:

You are invited to submit proposals for individual papers or panels (3 papers plus commentator) relating to the following strands:

1. The impact of global change on womens lives in specific localities.

2. Relations between women in the context of global inequalities of power.

3. Womens local responses and resistances to imperialism and globalisation.

4. Women, migrations, diasporas.

5. Empires at home: women in imperial metropoles.

6. Women as local producers, traders and consumers in a globalising economy.

7. Womens life histories and personal relationships across geo-political divides.

8. Womens involvement in transnational networks.

9. National womens histories in comparative perspective.

10. Teaching womens history in a globalising world.

11. The place of the global in local, community and public histories of women.

Conference languages: English and French

Please submit your proposal online through the conference website http://www.ifrwh2013conf.org.uk/submit-paper

Samantha Jackson, Events Officer, Sheffield Hallam University Facilities Directorate, 20 Furnival Street, Sheffield S1 4QT
Phone: (44) 114 224 4526
Email: conference21@shu.ac.uk
Visit the website at http://www.ifrwh2013conf.org.uk

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Sortie de « De l’utilité du genre » de Joan Scott

Note de l’éditeur

Qu’est-ce que le genre ? Comment les identités sexuelles et les rapports entre hommes et femmes sont-ils construits, et comment se transforment-ils ? Quel rôle jouent, dans ces processus, la politique et les mobilisations collectives, l’économique et le social, mais aussi le langage et l’inconscient ? Historienne mondialement reconnue, Joan W. Scott a imposé l’idée selon laquelle le genre ne constitue pas seulement un domaine d’investigation : c’est un instrument critique destiné à transformer la réflexion dans tous les secteurs. Pour elle, il se situe au cœur de toute relation de pouvoir et traverse l’ensemble des dynamiques à l’œuvre dans la société. Ce volume réunit les grands essais de Joan W. Scott sur le genre publiés entre 1986 et 2011. Des textes qui renouvellent l’analyse de questions aussi diverses que la laïcité, la démocratie, la représentation de l’État et de l’identité nationale, ou encore celle du marxisme et des classes sociales. À l’heure où les études sur le genre se multiplient, Joan W. Scott s’interroge sur l’avenir du féminisme. Elle s’inquiète de la manière dont cette catégorie est si souvent vidée de ses implications radicales. Et montre comment elle peut continuer à nous inciter à penser autrement.

Table des matières :

– Introduction
– Le genre, une catégorie utile d’analyse historique, 1986.
– Les femmes dans La Formation de la classe ouvrière anglaise, 1988.
– Quelques autres réflexions sur le genre et la politique, 1998.
– Sécularité ou Sexularité? La laïcité et l’égalité des sexes, 2010.
– La séduction, une théorie française, 2011.
– Conclusion. Le « lourd passé » du féminisme, 2004.

http://www.fayard.fr/livre/fayard-380273-De-l-utilite-du-genre-hachette.html

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website