Archives du mot-clé gender

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History (Forum: Rethinking Key Concepts in Gender History)

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History (Forum: Rethinking Key Concepts in Gender History)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gend.2016.28.issue-2/issuetoc

 

Volume 28, Issue 2, August 2016

 

Editorial

Editorial (pages 275–282)

Stuart Airlie, Maud Anne Bracke and Rosemary Elliot

 

Leonore Davidoff and the Founding of Gender & History (pages 283–287)

Jane Rendall and Keith McClelland

 

Blood, Contract and Intimacy: History and Practice with Leonore Davidoff (pages 288–298)

Megan Doolittle, Janet Fink and Katherine Holden

 

Forum: Rethinking Key Concepts in Gender History

Critical Thoughts on Keywords in Gender and History: An Introduction (pages 299–306)

Shireen Hassim

 

Gender Binary and the Limits of Poststructuralist Method (pages 307–323)

Anna Krylova

 

Historicising Agency (pages 324–339)

Lynn M. Thomas

 

‘Intersectionality’, Socialist Feminism and Contemporary Activism: Musings by a Second-Wave Socialist Feminist (pages 340–357)

Linda Gordon

 

Beyond ‘Crisis’ in Understanding Gender Transformation

Mary Louise Roberts

 

Degrading the Male Body: Manhood and Conflict in the High-medieval Low Countries (pages 367–386)

Stefan Meysman

 

Knightly Masculinity, Court Games and Material Culture in Late-medieval Portugal: The Case of Constable Afonso (c.1480–1504) (pages 387–400)

Hélder Carvalhal and Isabel dos Guimarães Sá

 

‘Poor Gordon’: What the Australian Cult of Adam Lindsay Gordon Tells Us About Turn-of-the-Twentieth-Century Masculine Sentimentality (pages 401–421)

Melissa Bellanta

 

Should we Abstain? Spousal Equality in Twelfth-century Byzantine Canon Law (pages 422–437)

Maroula Perisanidi

 

‘No More Fears, No More Tears’?: Gender, Emotion and the Aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars in France (pages 438–460)

Jennifer Heuer

 

Affection and Assimilation: Concubinage and the Ideal of Conjugal Love in Colonial Korea, 1922–38 (pages 461–479)

Sungyun Lim

 

‘Writing’ Black Womanhood in the Early Cuban Republic, 1904–16 (pages 480–500)

Takkara Brunson

 

Mourned Choices and Grievable Lives: The Anti-Abortion Movement’s Influence in Defining the Abortion Experience in Australia Since the 1960s (pages 501–519)

Erica Millar

 

Reviews

Anne-Marie Kilday, A History of Infanticide in Britain, c.1600 to the Present, (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), pp. 338. ISBN 978-0-230-54707-0 (hb). (pages 520–521)

 

Bronwen Neil and Lynda Garland (eds), Questions of Gender in Byzantine Society (Ashgate: Farnham, 2013), pp. x + 218. ISBN 978-1-4094-4779-5 (hb), 978-1-4094-4780-1 (ebook), 978-1-4094-7449-4 (ePUB). Judith Herrin, Unrivalled Influence: Women and Empire in Byzantium (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013), pp. xix + 328. ISBN 978-0-691-15321-6. (pages 522–526)

 

Philip Grace, Affectionate Authorities: Fathers and Fatherly Roles in Late Medieval Basel (Farnham: Ashgate, 2015), pp. x + 186. ISBN 978-1-4724-4554-4 (hb). (pages 527–528)

 

Darlene Abreu-Ferreira, Women, Crime, and Forgiveness in Early Modern Portugal (Burlington: Ashgate, 2015), pp. xii + 237. ISBN 978-1-47244-2314. (pages 529–530)

 

Gary Waller, A Cultural Study of Mary and the Annunciation: From Luke to the Enlightenment (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2015), pp. 256. ISBN 1-848-93575-7 (hb). (pages 531–532)

 

Helen McCarthy, Women of the World: The Rise of the Female Diplomat (London: Bloomsbury, 2014), pp. xii + 416. ISBN: 978-1-408-84004-7 (pb). (pages 533–534)

 

Josephine Hoegaerts, Masculinity and Nationhood, 1830–1910: Constructions of Identity and Citizenship in Belgium (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2014), pp. xii + 242. 978-1-137-39199-5 (hb). (pages 535–536)

 

Merrill D. Smith (ed.), Cultural Encyclopedia of the Breast (Lanham: Rownan and Littlefield, 2014), pp. xi + 288. ISBN 978-0-7591-2331-1 (hb); 978-0-7591-2332-8 (ebook). (pages 537–538)

 

Sarah B. Rodriguez, Female Circumcision and Clitoridectomy in the United States: A History of Medical Treatment (Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2014), pp. ix + 280. ISBN: 978-1-58046-498-7 (hb). (pages 539–540)

 

Marilyn Booth, Classes of Ladies of Cloistered Spaces: Writing Feminist History through Biography in Fin-de-Siècle Egypt (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015), pp. v + 466. ISBN 978-0-7486-9486-0 (hb); 978-1-4744-0341-2 (epub). (pages 541–542)

 

Maria Fritsche, Homemade Men in Postwar Austrian Cinema: Nationhood, Genre and Masculinity (New York: Berghahn, 2013), pp. xi + 274. ISBN 978-0-85745-945-9 (hb); ISBN 978-0-85745-945-6 (ebook). (pages 543–544)

 

Eileen J. Suárez Findlay, We Are Left without a Father Here: Masculinity, Domesticity, and Migration in Postwar Puerto Rico (Durham: Duke University Press, 2014), pp. xii + 300. ISBN 978-0-8223-5766-7 (hb); 978-0-8223-5782-7 (pb). (pages 545–546)

 

Marilyn Morris, Sex, Money & Personal Character in Eighteenth-Century British Politics (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), pp. xiv + 257. ISBN 978-0-300-20845-0 (hb). (pages 547–548)

 

John H. Arnold and Sean Brady, What is Masculinity? Historical Dynamics from Antiquity to the Contemporary World (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), pp. v + 461. ISBN: 978-0-230-27813-4 (hb); 978-1-137-30560-2 (pb). (pages 549–550)

 

Tanya Fitzgerald and Elizabeth M. Smyth (eds), Women Educators, Leaders and Activists: Educational Lives and Networks, 1900–1960 (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), pp. v + 214. ISBN 978-1-137-30351-6 (hb). (pages 551–552)

 

Save

Save

Save

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gwao.v23.5/issuetoc

 

September 2016

Volume 23, Issue 5

 

‘But It’s Your Job To Be Friendly’: Employees Coping With and Contesting Sexual Harassment from Customers in the Service Sector

Laura Good and Rae Cooper

 

Denied Citizens of Turkey: Experiences of Discrimination Among LGBT Individuals in Employment, Housing and Health Care

Volkan Yılmaz and İpek Göçmen

 

Women Academics and Work–Life Balance: Gendered Discourses of Work and Care

Kim Toffoletti and Karen Starr

 

‘In a Male Workplace, Things Would Never Be Like This’: Using Gendered Notions to Neutralize Conflicts in a Swedish Supermarket

Kristina Johansson

 

‘To Do Or Not To Do (Gender)’ and Changing the Sex-Typing of British Theatre

Daniel Sage and Catherine Rees

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History, Vol. 28, No. 2

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History
https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/33651

Volume 28, Issue 2, Summer 2016

Articles
On Women’s Bodies: Experience of Dehumanization during the Holocaust
Nicole Ephgrave

Cadres, Grain, and Sexual Abuse in Wuwei County, Mao’s China
Bin Yang and Shuji Cao

Speech, Sex, and Mobility: Norwegian Women in a Late Nineteenth-Century « English-speaking » Settler Colony
Nadia Rhook

From Sperm Runners to Sperm Banks: Lesbians, Assisted Conception, and Challenging the Fertility Industry, 1971 – 1983
Katie Batza

Baby M: American Feminists Repond to a Controversial Case
Joyce Peterson

The Material Culture of Childbirth in Late Medieval London and its Suburbs
Katherine French

Book Reviews

Historicizing Gender, Medicine, and Biopolitics
Okezi T. Otovo

Early Modern Prostitutes, Concubines, and Mistresses
Yasuko Sato

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History, Special Issue: Men at Home: Domesticities, Authority, Emotions and Work

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History

 

Volume 27, Issue 3, November 2015

 

Special Issue: Men at Home: Domesticities, Authority, Emotions and Work

Edited by: Raffaella Sarti

Articles:

Men at Home: Domesticities, Authority, Emotions and Work (Thirteenth–Twentieth Centuries) (pages 521–558)

   Raffaella Sarti

 

Part I – Which Domesticities?

 

Home and Away: The Flight from Domesticity in Late-Nineteenth-Century England Re-visited (pages 561–575)

   John Tosh

 

Illicit Intimacies: The Imagined ‘Homes’ of Gilbert Innes of Stow and his Mistresses (1751–1832) (pages 576–590)

Katie Barclay

 

Native American Men – and Women – at Home in Plural Marriages in Seventeenth-Century New France (pages 591–610)

   Sarah M. S. Pearsall

 

Lock Up Your Daughters! Male Activists, ‘Patriotic Domesticity’ and the Fight Against Sex Trafficking in England, 1880–1912 (pages 611–627)

   Rachael Attwood

 

Domesticity as Socio-Cultural Construction: Domestic Slavery, Home and the Quintal in Cabo Delgado (Mozambique) (pages 628–648)

   Francesca Declich

 

 

Part II – Male Authority, Love and Conflicts

 

Meanings of Fatherhood in Late-Medieval Montpellier: Love, Care and the Exercise of Patria Potestas (pages 651–668)

   Lucie Laumonier

 

Generations of Men and Masculinity in Two Late-Medieval Biographies of Saints (pages 669–683)

   Marita von Weissenberg

 

The Moretti Family: Late Marriage, Bachelorhood and Domestic Authority in Seventeenth-Century Venice (pages 684–702)

   Lisa Dallavalle

 

Fathers at Home: Life Writing and Late-Victorian and Edwardian Plebeian Domestic Masculinities (pages 703–717)

   Julie-Marie Strange

 

 

Part III – Material Culture, Household Economy and Work

 

A Passion for Porcelain, Silverware and Furniture in Male Aristocratic Homes (in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Central Italy) (pages 721–735)

   Benedetta Borello

 

The Early Modern German Professor at Home – Masculinity, Bachelorhood and Family Concepts (Sixteenth–Eighteenth Centuries) (pages 736–751)

   Elizabeth Harding

 

Husbands, Masculinity, Male Work and Household Economy in Eighteenth-Century Italy: The Case of Turin (pages 752–772)

   Beatrice Zucca Micheletto

 

Informal Economies and Masculine Hierarchies in Slave Communities of the US South, 1800–65 (pages 773–787)

   David Doddington

 

Part IV – Men at Home between Tradition and Innovation

 

The Bureaucrat, the Mulla and the Maverick Intellectual ‘at Home’: Domestic Narratives of Patriarchy, Masculinity and Modernity in Iran, 1880–1980 (pages 791–811)

   Joanna de Groot

 

Masculine Ways of Being at Home: Hobbies, Do-It-Yourself and Home Improvement in Argentina (1940–70) (pages 812–827)

   Inés Pérez

 

Fathers in 1960s Switzerland: A Silent Revolution? (pages 828–843)

   Caroline Rusterholz

 

Is the Personal Political for Men too? Encounter and Conflict between ‘New Left’ Men and Feminist Movements in 1970s Italy (pages 844–864)

   Paola Stelliferi

 

“The Ultimate Extension of Gay Community”: Communal Living and Gay Liberation in the 1970s (pages 865–881)

   Stephen Vider

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work, & Organization

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work, & Organization

 

Volume 22, Issue 5, September 2015

Special Issue: Gendered Ageing in the New Economy

Edited by: Kathleen Riach, Wendy Loretto, Clary Krekula

Articles:

Gendered Ageing in the New Economy: Introduction to Special Issue (pages 437–444) Kathleen Riach, Wendy Loretto and Clary Krekula

Gendering Pensions: Making Women Visible (pages 445–458) Jo Grady

Work, Age and Other Drugs: Exploring the Intersection of Age and Masculinity in a Pharmaceutical Organization (pages 459–473) Barbara Foweraker and Leanne Cutcher

‘Success Is Satisfaction with What You Have’? Biographical Work–Life Balance of Older Female Employees in Public Administration (pages 474–494) Elisabeth Schilling

Technical Change and the Un/Troubling of Gendered Ageing in Healthcare Work (pages 495–509) Susan Halford, Natalia Kukarenko, Ann Therese Lotherington and Aud Obstfelder

Taking Stock: A Visual Analysis of Gendered Ageing (pages 510–528) Katrina Pritchard and Rebecca Whiting

Ageing, Corporeality and Embodiment, by Chris Gilleard and Paul Higgs. Anthem Press, 2014. 228 pp., hbk £60.00: Fashion and Age: Dress, the Body, and Later Life, by Julie Twigg. Bloomsbury, 2013. 184 pp., pbk £19.99 (pages 529–531) Sophie Hales

Older Workers in an Ageing Society: Critical Topics in Research and Policy, edited by Philip Taylor. Edward Elgar Publishers, 2013. 276 pp., hbk £83.00 (pages 532–533) Satu Heikkinen and Magnus Nilsson

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Call for Papers

Difficult Conversations: Thinking and Talking about Women,
Genders, and Sexualities Inside and Outside the Academy
at Hofstra University, Hempstead NY
June 1-4, 2017

The deadline for submission of proposals for individual papers, panels, and other sessions is January 15, 2016.  All proposals must be submitted electronically via the Berkshire Conference website. (http://2017berkshireconference.hofstra.edu/call-for-papers/#instructions). This site will be available for submissions from August 1, 2015 to January 15, 2016. As part of the submission process, you will be asked to select the Theme Track, or subject area, in which you would like your proposal considered. Your proposal will then be forwarded to the appropriate Track Chair.

Themed Tracks

From those listed below, please identify the subject area in which you wish to have your proposal considered. Note: Several divisions include suggested themes for exploration. These suggestions do not preclude proposals on other topics.  Questions about tracks should be directed to track co-chairs.

  1. Gender and the State: Majorities and Minorities

The state is present in gendered debates on the rights and obligations of citizenship, the provision of social welfare, governance and control, hierarchy and fealty, discrimination and marginalization. State power and also state violence are expressed differentially according to gender, with reference to legal status, reproductive rights, marriage, death, and an individual’s inclusion in the polity. Proposals might explore some of the following questions: How are gendered experiences and identities shaped by the state, and how do the demands of sexual, racial, ethnic, religious, and indigenous minorities shape state practices and institutions? How does power circulate between majorities and minorities, and how is difference, subordination, and subjecthood produced by the state, and also challenged by non-dominant communities? Specific examples might also refer to legal equality and legal status; struggles for suffrage; reproductive, human, and migrant rights; and the regulation of gendered forms of labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Social Justice, Migration and the City

Cities – as spatial forms, economic entities, and human habitats – are dynamic hubs where identity, social relations, power, inequality, and social change are visible and contested in the natural, built, and human environment, in memories and artifacts of the past, and the present. Movements of people searching for better lives and for greater opportunities, fleeing persecution and violence, or just escaping the confines of their previous lives, often end up in cities. Whether segregated or intermingled, people from different regions and different parts of the world negotiate space and identity, fight for justice and create change. We invite proposals from historians and interdisciplinary scholars working on different geographical areas, or transnationally, that explore some aspect of the historical role that migrants, migration and urban space have played in advancing both inequality and freedom, in incubating struggles for social justice and change.

Proposals in this track are encouraged to consider the following questions: how migration and mobility have impacted economic, social, cultural and political relations and formations; how the city as a spatial form influences perceptions about poverty and wealth, citizenship, social control and the nation of freedom; how global forces, markets and privatization create and/or shape urban spaces and people’s lives; how inequalities manifest in urban spaces and through institutions such as housing, employment, and education; how cities shape notions of community and belonging, identity, access and exclusion; and how urban (suburban and ex-urban) environments structure organizing, grassroots activism and social justice agendas

Track Chairs:

  1. Globalized Labor

Examining women’s labor from a global perspective offers many possibilities to consider historical specificity, women’s migration, political involvement, and transnational social movements, as well as the multiple ways in which women’s labor shapes and is shaped by broader political and economic processes. It also examines how women’s labor has defined global circuits, labor demands, and transnational labor, especially in regards to intimate labor, care-giving, outsourcing life (surrogacy), lack of documentation, and informal economies.  By the same token, we are interested in papers that look at how women have organized to challenge women’s disenfranchisement and oppression within globalized systems of labor and production.

We invite proposals from historians of different geographical areas, transnational scholars, as well as activists that address the following areas: women and transatlantic/transpacific migration; trafficking and forced labor; neoliberalism and labor migration; subcontracted labor; guest workers; the informal sector; women entrepreneurs; the gender pay gap; women’s labor and climate change; segregated labor markets; international labor organizing; women’s labor and social reproduction; transnational families and women’s work; surrogate motherhood and transnational adoption; women’s labor and free trade policy; the wages for housework movement; working class/labor movements; transnational social movements; the International Labour Organization (ILO) and women’s labor; labor legislation/protective legislation and women workers.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

  4. Slavery and Other Forms of Unfree Labor

We invite historians, activists, and others who are interested in examining how systems of unfree labor shaped lived experiences in “free” and “unfree” societies from ancient times to the twenty-first century. Slavery configured the geographic landscape of all who came into contact with it and connected societies economically, especially as global capitalism developed rapidly.  As a result of slavery’s commodification, systems of inequality were established that still linger.  We hope that the panel presentations offered will provide deep analyses of slavery, push forward new methodological approaches, broaden historiographical borders that have surrounded the subject, and advance new questions about the historical legacies of unfree labor.  We are especially interested in receiving proposals that emphasize the gendered dimensions of slavery and unfree labor in comparative frameworks temporally and spatially, from the ancient world to the 21st century. Papers might include analyses of slave systems that connected societies across the Atlantic, Pacific or Indian oceans, trans-Saharan slavery, convict labor, sexual (including marriage) and debt slavery, or other institutions of bonded labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Capitalism

With the recent, renewed interest in the history of capitalism, we seek to open up a conversation that deepens our understanding of capitalism and its diverse role in the transformation of economies and societies across the globe.  We are particularly interested in proposals that consider how the study of women and gender can help us better understand global capitalism as an internally differentiated and interconnected, shared structure.  Proposals that join an innovative use of both quantitative and qualitative methods and evidence will be given special consideration, as will those that incorporate how historians, activists, artists, economists and others have engaged with the histories of capitalism.  We invite submissions on topics as diverse as corporate capitalism, the service economy, markets and consumption, business, the environment and development, social networks, globalization and antiglobalization, and big data.

Track chairs:

  1. Sexualities, Gender Identities and Expressions

We call for proposals that consider the question of how sex, sexualities and gender are managed and maintained across boundaries of race, class, and culture  (among others). New paths of contestation engaging the fluidity of genders and sexualities are called for in the current state of emergency surrounding issues of anti-Black racism and police brutality that have generated public protest in the United States.  Similarly, popular and state uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa (among others), have destabilized conventional hierarchies. How might these conflicts generate new models of activism, scholarship, and praxis along axes of gender identity, expression, and sexualities?  How do emergent gender identities and sexual expressions produce both antagonisms and possibilities? Papers that concern historically situated race and racism and local and transnational state violence are particularly relevant.  The Sexualities and Gender Identities and Expressions track will also consider but not be limited to: queer pedagogies; reproductive technologies and sexualities; relations among Feminist Studies/LGBTQ Studies/ Queer Studies; police states and violence; intimate partner violence; social protest; pleasure and sexual practices; trans*/national movements and movement building; political coalitions; dangerous intimacies.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

7. Women, Gender and Science

The Program Committee welcomes proposals for panels, papers, round-table discussions, or other presentations on all aspects of the history of women, gender(s), and science (including medicine and technology). We are particularly interested in creating a program that includes a range of geographic areas, historical periods, and methodologies. We welcome proposals that are interdisciplinary and intersectional, and that represent a diverse set of voices within academia and beyond including, but not limited to, those that engage visual and performing arts, science fiction, civic science, do-it-yourself experiments, computing and the Maker Movement. We especially encourage panel proposals that bring together scholars, artists, and/or practitioners around a common theme.

Track Chairs:

  1. Pedagogy and Work Culture, K-12

The Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities brings together thousands of historians, activists, educators, and artists to share their research and activism. The 2017 conference especially wants to involve teachers and teacher educators in a lively discussion of teachers’ work as well as curriculum, pedagogy, and the history of education informed by feminist, queer, Marxist, and race-based theory. We plan to partner teachers and teacher educators with academics, school activists, museum educators, librarians, and artists to explore gender and sexuality in school curricula and the life of schools and those who work there. A range of creative presentation formats—including performance-based, digital, and open forum—are encouraged.  Possible topics include:  How genders and sexuality are taught (or not taught) in the curriculum in the era of high stakes testing; Engaging social issues in K-12 curriculum (e.g., peace, suffrage, temperance, anti-lynching) that illuminate and enrich the understanding of a particular era or movement;  The gendered nature of the attack on public education, the history of women in the schools, and teacher union history; Gender and the work of teachers, including oral histories of closeted and “out” queer educators.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and War

War, as a time of dramatic rupture and change, can bring terrible suffering but also, potentially, opportunity. Wars serve to construct, fracture and challenge gender identities and gendered hierarchies. Gender, moreover, has been a mobilizing theme for both anti-war and militaristic movements. We invite innovative contributions that address topics such as the gendered dimensions of both home fronts and battle fronts; the intersections of gender, ethnicity and religious identification in war contexts; the ways that different genders and sexualities are negotiated within wartime regimes; the intersections of war, gender, science and technology; the gendered dimensions of war memory, memorialization and mourning; the gendering of wartime discourse and propaganda; and media, literary and visual representations of gender, war and conflict. Submissions may deal with any geographical area(s) and any historical era, from ancient to modern.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

10. Refugees, Asylum and Gender

Gender and sexuality have shaped the flow of people fleeing war persecution, man-made and natural catastrophes, playing a strong role not only in who flees, but also in what they experience. Additionally, as a form of forced migration, refugee migration invites juxtaposition with detention and deportation, international adoption, and human trafficking.  Thus we invite path breaking contributions that address the experiences of such coerced migrants in various  times and places, focusing on such topics as sustaining everyday life in refugee camps and in resettlement, gendered persecution (such as intimate partner violence, forced marriage, or rape) in asylum cases, gendered treatment of refugees, gendered effects of refugee and asylum policies, the gendered discourse of refugees and asylum, gendered forms of resilience and creativity,  the intersection of gender/race/culture/ability and sexuality and historic and ongoing inequity as a factor in forced migration. We especially welcome proposals that cross boundaries, creatively re-think the nature and format of presentations, and include presenters from beyond the confines of academia.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Religion

The twenty-first century has seen a revival of religion as a marker of gender difference in many parts of the globe.  Religious concepts and practices continue to be invoked to strengthen hierarchies, enforce conformity, and deny fundamental rights.  In light of those developments, submissions to Difficult Conversations on women, gender, and religion, are invited to reassess historical scholarship of the past decades that revealed competing theologies, and to question how, at this stage in history, scholars and activists may effectively advance more nuanced understandings of faith, religious systems, and the values associated with them.  Of particular interest are questions of gendered agency and authority in religion; religious “tradition” and identity; and the interplay between religion and sexuality.

Track Chairs:

  1. Performance Studies and Visual Culture

This track explores the ways in which performance and visual culture can create, interrogate, and reshape the meanings and representations of gender, sexuality, race, class, ability and other categories of identification.  Papers and presenters from any discipline that seeks to theorize and understand historical and contemporary modes of embodiment, agency, representation, and resistance are encouraged. Proposals may also incorporate short performances as a means of enhancing audience engagement with central questions about agency, representation and creation.  Presentations might use performance as an organizing framework for considering a wide range of gendered practices and relationships, including but not limited to: museums and memorials; landscapes and the built environment; food and consumption; technology and digital media; nationalism, totalitarianism, repression, and revolution; theatre and creative practices, literary production, and censorship.

Track Chairs:

  1. Politics and Popular Culture

The relationship between politics and popular culture is key to understanding women, gender, and sexualities across historical eras.  We invite submissions that critically engage the history of popular culture in any time period and locale.  Popular culture history has emerged as a vibrant field that yields new ways to study the intersections of race, gender, class, sexuality, and (dis)ability.  Submitters can take up a number of issues ranging from how and why popular culture is central to the quotidian experiences of people around the globe to its role in the shifting paradigms of feminism, body politics, critical race theory, trans studies, imperialism, transnational studies, and reproductive justice.  By centering on forms of popular cultural expression, including film, music, sports, dance, fashion, print media, social media, this track seeks to bring a diverse group of scholars, cultural producers, and practitioners into conversation with one another.

Track Chairs:

  1. Work Cultures/Work Realities: The Academy and Beyond

This track seeks individual papers, panels, or roundtable sessions on issues or themes relevant to the work we (broadly defined) do. We hope to generate informed conversation about pedagogy, but also working conditions—for those working in any capacity in higher educational institutions as well as those in other settings.  Given the service burdens in the academy that fall particularly heavily on women and people of color, how do we see that such contributions are valued?  Do we need to redefine teaching and service as intellectual endeavors?  Is it necessary to change dominant understandings of scholarship?  How would we set about doing these tasks?  These issues are particularly timely given attacks on university employees and the questions raised by politicians, parents, and students about the “value” or “utility” of history?  They are also important in light of those scholars, including public historians, public intellectuals, and digital humanists whose contributions often cannot be measured by “traditional” categories.  Other difficult conversations are to be had on how historians in various settings (schools, universities, non-profits, for-hire) can work together? We also seek to address how scholarship and work are married beyond the academy.  Can one still be a historian and work, for example, in non-academic settings.  What does it mean to be an Alt-Ac, public historian or history informed activist in 2017?

Track Chairs:

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1111/gend.2015.27.issue-1/asset/cover.gif?v=1&s=544c42b87d89d7f812a702ac1e89cfe215bf92ee

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291468-0424

 

Volume 27, Issue 2, August 2015
 

Articles:

Bodies of Evidence: Sex and Murder (or Gender and Homicide) in Early Modern England, c.1500–1680 (pages 245–262)

J. Kesselring

 

Women, ‘Usury’ and Credit in Early Modern England: The Case of the Maiden Investor (pages 263–292)

Judith M. Spicksley

 

‘Skills Proper to their Sex’: Cecilia Morillas and a New Domestic Education in Early Modern Spain (pages 293–306)

Margaret E. Boyle

 

The Pleasures of a Single Life: Envisioning Bachelorhood in Early Eighteenth-Century England (pages 307–328)

James Rosenheim

 

‘You May Bind Me, You May Beat Me, You May Even Kill Me’: Bridewealth, Consent and Conversion in Nineteenth-Century Abẹ́òkúta (in Present-day Southwest Nigeria) (pages 329–348)

Temilola Alanamu

 

Piety, Professionalism and Power: Chinese Protestant Missionary Physicians and Imperial Affiliations between Women in the Early Twentieth Century (pages 349–373)

Sarah Pripas-Kapit

 

Queering the Martial Races: Masculinity, Sex and Circumcision in the Twentieth-Century British Indian Army (pages 374–396)

Kate Imy

 

‘A Spanish Housewife is Your Next Door Neighbour’: British Women and the Spanish Civil War (pages 397–416)

Roseanna Webster

 

Dressing the Shop Window of Socialism: Gender and Consumption in the Soviet Union in the Era of ‘Cultured Trade’, 1934–53 (pages 417–445)

Philippa Hetherington

 

From ‘Mother of the Nation’ to ‘Lady Macbeth’: Winnie Mandela and Perceptions of Female Violence in South Africa, 1985–91 (pages 446–464)

Emily Bridger

 

Nirbhaya’s Body: The Politics of Protest in the Aftermath of the 2012 Delhi Gang Rape (pages 465–486)

Krupa Shandilya

 

This issue also contains abstracts and book reviews.

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Good and Mad Women: Histories of Gender, Then, and Now

Call for Papers

“Australian Women’s History Network Symposium 2015

Good and Mad Women: Histories of Gender, Then and Now

 

Just over three decades ago, Jill Julius Matthews published Good and Mad Women: The historical construction of femininity in twentieth century Australia (1984), her path-breaking feminist history. This important book pre-dated Joan W. Scott’s proclamation of gender as a ‘useful category of historical analysis’ (1986) and continues to be influential. The Australian Women’s History Network celebrates the book’s anniversary by calling for papers that historicise gender and/ or reflect on the historiography of gender. In particular we seek work that aims to trace and analyse – as Matthews did in Good and Mad Women – ‘the specific meaning and experience of becoming a woman’, whether in twentieth century Australia or elsewhere in time and place. ‪The symposium also offers a platform for speakers – individually or on panels – to revisit classic works of gender history, examining how these were foundational and for whom, or to survey contemporary currents in gender history.

The AWHN welcomes broad engagement with the field of gender history; other possible topics and themes include:

–          Gender and sexualities

–          Gender in cross-cultural comparison

–          Gender, politics and resistance

–          Transgender

–          Feminist critiques of gender

–          Gender and embodiment

–          Gender, race and ethnicity

–          Men and masculinities

–          Gender and pleasure

–          Class and gender

–          Gender and colonialism; gender and nationalism.

The AWHN Symposium will be held on Wednesday 8 July as part of the 2015 Australian Historical Association conference ‘Foundational Histories’ to be held at the University of Sydney 6-10 July 2015. The keynote speaker will be Professor Jill Matthews. The annual general meeting will be held at lunch time with a reception and dinner to follow the symposium.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 200 words (for individual papers and panels) to the symposium convenor Zora Simic <z.simic@unsw.edu.au> by 28 February 2015. Please send as word or RTF files with an author bio of no more than 50 words.

Papers that are not selected as part of the AWHN program will be considered for the AHA program.

Each paper will run for twenty minutes with ten minutes for question time. Panels are allocated 90 minutes in total.”

 

The Australian Women’s History Network is convened by Sharon Crozier-de Rosa (University of Wollongong), Vera Mackie (University of Wollongong) and Zora Simic (University of New South Wales).

 

The Network can be contacted at

<auswhn@gmail.com>

or

Australian Women’s History Network

c/o Professor Vera Mackie

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts

University of Wollongong

Wollongong, NSW, 2522

<http://www.auswhn.org.au/>

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization, November 2014

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization, November 2014

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gwao.2014.21.issue-6/issuetoc 

November 2014; 21 (6)

Le Sommaire:

The Social Dynamics Channelling Latina College Graduates into the Teaching Profession (pages 491–515)

Glenda M. Flores and Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

 

Cultural Correlates of Gender Integration in Science (pages 516–530)

Cindy L. Cain and Erin Leahey

 

Gendered Constructions of Leadership in Danish Job Advertisements (pages 531–545)

Inger Askehave and Karen Korning Zethsen

 

‘Dirt, Death and Danger? I Don’t Recall Any Adverse Reaction …’: Masculinity and the Taint Management of Hospital Private Security Work (pages 546–558)

Matthew S. Johnston and Edwin Hodge

 

Reflexivity and the Construction of Competing Discourses of Masculinity in a Female-Dominated Profession (pages 559–572)

Maria Adamson

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society, December 2014

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society, December 2014

 

http://gas.sagepub.com/content/28/6.toc

December 2014; 28 (6)

 

Le Sommaire:

Articles

Krista M. Brumley

The Gendered Ideal Worker Narrative: Professional Women’s and Men’s Work Experiences in the New Economy at a Mexican Company

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 799-823, first published on August 19, 2014

 

Rachel Rinaldo

Pious and Critical: Muslim Women Activists and the Question of Agency

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 824-846, first published on September 9, 2014

 

Catherine Bolzendahl

Opportunities and Expectations: The Gendered Organization of Legislative Committees in Germany, Sweden, and the United States

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 847-876, first published on August 1, 2014

 

Éléonore Lépinard

Doing Intersectionality: Repertoires of Feminist Practices in France and Canada

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 877-903, first published on July 25, 2014

 

Kristin Natalier and Belinda Hewitt

Separated Parents Reproducing and Undoing Gender Through Defining Legitimate Uses of Child Support

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 904-925, first published on August 19, 2014

 

Book Reviews

Bethany L. Brown

Book Review: Into the Fire: Disaster and the Remaking of Gender by Shelley Pacholok

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 926-928, first published on March 13, 2014

 

Jennifer L. Martin

Book Review: The Rise of Women: The Growing Gender Gap in Education and What It Means for American Schools by Thomas A. Diprete and Claudia Buchmann

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 928-929, first published on March 18, 2014

 

Kylie Parrotta

Book Review: Sexual Minorities in Sports: Prejudice at Play edited by Melanie L. Sartore-Baldwin

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 930-932, first published on March 21, 2014

 

Marybeth C. Stalp

Book Review: The Marginalized Majority: Media Representation and Lived Experiences of Single Women by Kristie Collins

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 932-934, first published on March 17, 2014

 

Catherine Mobley

Book Review: Our Roots Run Deep as Ironweed: Appalachian Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice by Shannon Elizabeth Bell

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 934-936, first published on April 25, 2014

 

Laura S. Logan

Book Review: Compassionate Confinement: A Year in the Life of Unit C by Laura S. Abrams and Ben Andersen-Nathe

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 936-938, first published on April 25, 2014

 

Laura V. Heston

Book Review: Queering Marriage: Challenging Family Formation in the United States by Katrina Kimport

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 938-940, first published on April 22, 2014

 

Emily S. Mann

Book Review: Amigas y Amantes: Sexually Nonconforming Latinas Negotiate Family by Katie L. Acosta

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 940-942, first published on June 23, 2014

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Gender & History fête sa 25ème année avec un numéro virtuel et des articles gratuits

 

Gender & History 25th Anniversary Virtual Issue

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291468-0424/homepage/gender___history_25yr_virtual_issue.htm

2013 marks the 25th anniversary of Gender & History. To celebrate this milestone for the journal, a new virtual issue has been created featuring highlights from the past 25 years. The virtual issue features articles, audio clips, commentary and an interview with the founding editor Leonore Davidoff.

Introduction
Click here to read the introduction to the 25th anniversary virtual issue by Lynn Abrams, Eleanor Gordon and Alexandra Shepard

Video Interview
Kate Barclay Interviews Leonore Davidoff, founding editor of Gender & History
Click here to watch the interview
Click here to read the transcript

Article Highlights from Twenty-five years of Gender & History

Judith M. Bennett, ‘Feminism and History’, Gender & History 1:3 (1989) pp. 251-72
Commentary by Pam Sharpe- Click here

Julia Smith, ‘Did Women Have a Transformation of the Roman World?’ Gender & History 12:3 (2000), pp. 552-71.
Audio Commentary, Lynn Abrams talks to Julia Smith- Click here
Transcript, Lynn Abrams talks to Julia Smith- Click here

Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, ‘Do Women Need the Renaissance? Gender, Change and Periodisation’, Gender & History 20:3 (2008), pp. 539-57.
Commentary by Garthine Walker- Click here

Karen Harvey, ‘The Substance of Sexual Difference: Change and Persistence in Representations of the Body in Eighteenth-Century England’, Gender & History 14:2 (2002), pp. 202-23.
Audio Commentary, Alexandra Shepard talks to Karen Harvey- Click here
Transcript, Alexandra Shepard talks to Karen Harvey- Click here

Kathleen Canning, ‘The Body as Method? Reflections on the Place of the Body in Gender History’ Gender & History 11:3, (1999), pp. 499-513.
Commentary by Kathleen Canning- Click here

Michele Mitchell, ‘Silences Broken, Silences Kept: Gender and Sexuality in African-American History’, Gender & History, 11:3 (1999), pp. 433-44.
Commentary by Michele Mitchell- Click here

Mrinalini Sinha, ‘Giving Masculinity a History: Some Contributions From the Historiography of Colonial India’, Gender & History 11:3 (1999), pp445-60.
Commentary by Clare Midgley- Click here

Toby L. Ditz, ‘The New Men’s History and the Peculiar Absence of Gendered Power: Some Remedies from Early American Gender History’, Gender & History 16:1 (2004), pp. 1-35
Commentary by Ruth Karras- Click here

Rebecca Rogers, ‘Telling Stories about the Colonies: British and French Women in Algeria in the Nineteenth Century’, Gender & History 21:1 (2009) pp. 39-59.
Commentary by Rebecca Rogers- Click here

Jeanne Boydston, ‘Gender as a Question of Historical Analysis: Gender, Change and Periodisation’, Gender & History 20:3, (2008), pp. 558–83.
Commentary by Tracey Deutsch- Click here

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization (July 2014)

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gwao.2014.21.issue-4/issuetoc

July 2014; 21 (4)

Le Sommaire:

The Scrutinized Priest: Women in the Church of England Negotiating Professional and Sacred Clothing Regimes

Sarah-Jane Page

 

Female Part-Time Managers: Careers, Mentors and Role Models

Susan Durbin and Jennifer Tomlinson

 

Imagining Gender Research: Violence, Masculinity, and the Shop Floor

Rafael Alcadipani and Maria Jose Tonelli

 

Access to Networks in Genderized Contexts: The Construction of Hierarchical Networks and Inequalities in Feminized, Caring and Masculinized, Technical Occupations

Tina Forsberg Kankkunen

 

Upsetting ‘Others’ in the Netherlands: Narratives of Muslim Turkish Migrant Businesswomen at the Crossroads of Ethnicity, Gender and Religion

Caroline Essers and Deirdre Tedmanson

 

Doing Gender, Practising Politics: Workplace Cultures in Local and Devolved Government

Nickie Charles

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History, April 2014

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gend.2014.26.issue-1/issuetoc

April 2014; 26 (1)

Forum: Women and Learned Culture

 Introduction (pages 1–4)

Judith P. Zinsser

 

Imagining Patterns of Learned Culture: A Cross-Cultural View (pages 5–22)

Judith P. Zinsser

 

Women in Chinese Learned Culture: Complexities, Exclusivities and Connecting Narratives (pages 23–35)    Harriet Zurndorfer

 

‘Speaking Together Openly, Honestly and Profoundly’: Men and Women as Public Intellectuals in Early-Twentieth-Century France (pages 36–51)

Jean Elisabeth Pedersen

 

A Prize for Grumpy Old Men? Reflections on the Lack of Female Nobel Laureates (pages 52–63)

Marika Hedin

 

 

Articles

 

Overthrowing the Floresta–Wollstonecraft Myth for Latin American Feminism (pages 64–83)

Eileen Hunt Botting and Charlotte Hammond Matthews

 

A Man Like You: Juan Domingo Perón and the Politics of Attraction in Mid-Twentieth-Century Argentina (pages 84–104)

Natalia Milanesio

 

Landowning, Dispossession and the Significance of Land among Dakota and Scandinavian Women at Spirit Lake, 1900–29 (pages 105–127)

Karen V. Hansen and Grey Osterud

 

‘You Must Avenge on My Behalf’: Widow Chastity and Honour in Nineteenth-Century Korea (pages 128–146)

Jungwon Kim

 

The Phantasm of the Feminine: Gender, Race and Nationalist Agency in Early Twentieth-Century China (pages 147–166)

Ping Zhu

 

“Till We Hear the Last All Clear”: Gender and the Presentation of Self in Young Girls’ Writing about the Bombing of Hull during the Second World War (pages 167–183)

James Greenhalgh

 

Reviews

Elaine Farrell (ed.), ‘She Said She Was in the Family Way’: Pregnancy and Infancy in Modern Ireland (London: Institute of Historical Research, 2012), pp. xix + 247. ISBN: 978 1905165650. (pages 184–185)

KATIE BARCLAY

 

Charu Gupta (ed.), Gendering Colonial India: Reforms, Print, Caste and Communalism (New Delhi: Orient BlackSwan, 2012), pp. viii + 394. ISBN: 978 813504472 7. (pages 185–186)

SUMITA MUKHERJEE

 

Jonathan Daniel Wells, Women Writers and Journalists in the Nineteenth-Century South (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011), pp. xii + 244. ISBN: 978 1107012660. (pages 186–188)

LYDIA J. PLATH

 

Carrie Hamilton, Sexual Revolutions in Cuba: Passion, Politics, and Memory (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012), pp. vii + 298. ISBN: 978 0807835197. (pages 188–189)

CYNTHIA WRIGHT

 

Tara Povey and Elaheh Rostami-Povey (eds), Women, Power and Politics in 21st Century Iran (Ashgate, 2012), pp. xv + 218. ISBN: 978 1409402046. (pages 189–191)

SHIRIN SAEIDI

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society

http://gas.sagepub.com/content/28/1.toc

February 2014; 28 (1)

Les articles:

Valerie Jenness and Sarah Fenstermaker

Agnes Goes to Prison: Gender Authenticity, Transgender Inmates in Prisons for Men, and Pursuit of “The Real Deal”

 

Laurel Westbrook and Kristen Schilt

Doing Gender, Determining Gender: Transgender People, Gender Panics, and the Maintenance of the Sex/Gender/Sexuality System

 

Tristan Bridges

A Very “Gay” Straight?: Hybrid Masculinities, Sexual Aesthetics, and the Changing Relationship between Masculinity and Homophobia

 

Monisha Das Gupta

“Don’t Deport Our Daddies”: Gendering State Deportation Practices and Immigrant Organizing

 

Erin M. Rehel

When Dad Stays Home Too: Paternity Leave, Gender, and Parenting

 

Marci D. Cottingham

Recruiting Men, Constructing Manhood: How Health Care Organizations Mobilize Masculinities as Nursing Recruitment Strategy

 

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Journal of Women’s History, Le 25ième anniversaire de la Revue

Dernier numéro de la revue:

Journal of Women’s History

Le 25ième anniversaire de la Revue

Avec un article à noter spécifiquement: Elieen Boris, “Class Returns”

 

Volume 25, Number 4, Winter 2013

Journal of Women’s History at 25: The Anniversary Issue

Guest Editors: Teresa A. Meade, Leila J. Rupp

 

Guest Editorial Note

Journal of Women’s History at 25: The Anniversary Issue

Teresa A. Meade, Leila J. Rupp

 

Reshaping History: The Intersection of Radical and Women’s History

Iris Berger, Stephen Brier, Ellen Carol DuBois, Jean H. Quataert, David Serlin, Rhonda Y. Williams, Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, Eileen Boris, Kate Weigand

 

Thematic Articles

Turns of the Kaleidoscope: “Race,” Ethnicity, and Analytical Patterns in American Women’s and Gender History

Michele Mitchell

 

Class Returns

Eileen Boris

 

Since Intimate Matters: Recent Developments in the History of Sexuality in the United States

John D’Emilio, Estelle B. Freedman

 

Layering the Lenses: Toward Understanding Reproductive Politics in the United States

Rickie Solinger

 

A Presence in the Past: A Transgender Historiography

Genny Beemyn

 

Not Just Any Body: Disability, Gender, and History

Susan Burch, Lindsey Patterson

 

Women, Gender, Intimacy, and Empire

Elisa Camiscioli

 

Welfare States, Neoliberal Regimes, and International Political Economy: Gender Politics of Latin America in Global Context

Karin Alejandra Rosemblatt

 

On Borderlands/La Frontera: Gloria Anzaldúa and Twenty-Five Years of Research on Gender in the Borderlands

Monica Perales

Eugénie Cotton, Pak Chong-ae, and Claudia Jones: Rethinking Transnational Feminism and International Politics

Francisca de Haan

 

National/Regional Articles

Women’s and Gender History in Australia: A Transformative Practice

Marilyn Lake

 

The Pleasures and Perils of Feminist Tributes—Canada

Franca Iacovetta, Catherine Carstairs

 

Chinese Women’s History: Global Circuits, Local meanings

Joan Judge

 

Recent Collaborative Endeavors by Historians of Women and Gender in Japan

Yuko Takahashi

 

The Women’s Movement under Ottoman and Republican Rule: A Historical Reappraisal

Arzu Öztürkmen

 

Feminism and Women’s History in Academic Institutions in the Southern Cone: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Uruguay

Cecilia Belej, Ana Lía Rey

 

Twenty-Five Years of African Women Writing African Women’s and Gendered Worlds

Nwando Achebe

 

The Past and Present of European Women’s and Gender History: A Transatlantic Conversation

Ida Blom, Mineke Bosch, Antoinette Burton, Anna Clark, Karen Hagemann, Laura E. Nym Mayhall, Karen Offen, Mary Louise Roberts, Birgitte Søland, Mary Jo Maynes

 

Women’s and Men’s World History? Not Yet

Judith P. Zinsser

 

The Practice of History

Clio in the Curriculum: The State of Women and Women’s History in the Middle and High School Curriculum…and Perhaps a way Forward

Barbara Winslow

 

Women, Men, and Others: The Challenges of Mainstreaming Gender History in the Classroom

Kumkum Roy

 

The Business of History: Working as a Historical Consultant

Heather Lee Miller

 

Thou Shalt Commit: The Internet, New Media, and the Future of Women’s History

Claire Bond Potter

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l’University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j’analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française – et une grande partie de l’Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn