Tous les articles par Katie Jarvis

A propos Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Call for Papers

Difficult Conversations: Thinking and Talking about Women,
Genders, and Sexualities Inside and Outside the Academy
at Hofstra University, Hempstead NY
June 1-4, 2017

The deadline for submission of proposals for individual papers, panels, and other sessions is January 15, 2016.  All proposals must be submitted electronically via the Berkshire Conference website. (http://2017berkshireconference.hofstra.edu/call-for-papers/#instructions). This site will be available for submissions from August 1, 2015 to January 15, 2016. As part of the submission process, you will be asked to select the Theme Track, or subject area, in which you would like your proposal considered. Your proposal will then be forwarded to the appropriate Track Chair.

Themed Tracks

From those listed below, please identify the subject area in which you wish to have your proposal considered. Note: Several divisions include suggested themes for exploration. These suggestions do not preclude proposals on other topics.  Questions about tracks should be directed to track co-chairs.

  1. Gender and the State: Majorities and Minorities

The state is present in gendered debates on the rights and obligations of citizenship, the provision of social welfare, governance and control, hierarchy and fealty, discrimination and marginalization. State power and also state violence are expressed differentially according to gender, with reference to legal status, reproductive rights, marriage, death, and an individual’s inclusion in the polity. Proposals might explore some of the following questions: How are gendered experiences and identities shaped by the state, and how do the demands of sexual, racial, ethnic, religious, and indigenous minorities shape state practices and institutions? How does power circulate between majorities and minorities, and how is difference, subordination, and subjecthood produced by the state, and also challenged by non-dominant communities? Specific examples might also refer to legal equality and legal status; struggles for suffrage; reproductive, human, and migrant rights; and the regulation of gendered forms of labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Social Justice, Migration and the City

Cities – as spatial forms, economic entities, and human habitats – are dynamic hubs where identity, social relations, power, inequality, and social change are visible and contested in the natural, built, and human environment, in memories and artifacts of the past, and the present. Movements of people searching for better lives and for greater opportunities, fleeing persecution and violence, or just escaping the confines of their previous lives, often end up in cities. Whether segregated or intermingled, people from different regions and different parts of the world negotiate space and identity, fight for justice and create change. We invite proposals from historians and interdisciplinary scholars working on different geographical areas, or transnationally, that explore some aspect of the historical role that migrants, migration and urban space have played in advancing both inequality and freedom, in incubating struggles for social justice and change.

Proposals in this track are encouraged to consider the following questions: how migration and mobility have impacted economic, social, cultural and political relations and formations; how the city as a spatial form influences perceptions about poverty and wealth, citizenship, social control and the nation of freedom; how global forces, markets and privatization create and/or shape urban spaces and people’s lives; how inequalities manifest in urban spaces and through institutions such as housing, employment, and education; how cities shape notions of community and belonging, identity, access and exclusion; and how urban (suburban and ex-urban) environments structure organizing, grassroots activism and social justice agendas

Track Chairs:

  1. Globalized Labor

Examining women’s labor from a global perspective offers many possibilities to consider historical specificity, women’s migration, political involvement, and transnational social movements, as well as the multiple ways in which women’s labor shapes and is shaped by broader political and economic processes. It also examines how women’s labor has defined global circuits, labor demands, and transnational labor, especially in regards to intimate labor, care-giving, outsourcing life (surrogacy), lack of documentation, and informal economies.  By the same token, we are interested in papers that look at how women have organized to challenge women’s disenfranchisement and oppression within globalized systems of labor and production.

We invite proposals from historians of different geographical areas, transnational scholars, as well as activists that address the following areas: women and transatlantic/transpacific migration; trafficking and forced labor; neoliberalism and labor migration; subcontracted labor; guest workers; the informal sector; women entrepreneurs; the gender pay gap; women’s labor and climate change; segregated labor markets; international labor organizing; women’s labor and social reproduction; transnational families and women’s work; surrogate motherhood and transnational adoption; women’s labor and free trade policy; the wages for housework movement; working class/labor movements; transnational social movements; the International Labour Organization (ILO) and women’s labor; labor legislation/protective legislation and women workers.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

  4. Slavery and Other Forms of Unfree Labor

We invite historians, activists, and others who are interested in examining how systems of unfree labor shaped lived experiences in “free” and “unfree” societies from ancient times to the twenty-first century. Slavery configured the geographic landscape of all who came into contact with it and connected societies economically, especially as global capitalism developed rapidly.  As a result of slavery’s commodification, systems of inequality were established that still linger.  We hope that the panel presentations offered will provide deep analyses of slavery, push forward new methodological approaches, broaden historiographical borders that have surrounded the subject, and advance new questions about the historical legacies of unfree labor.  We are especially interested in receiving proposals that emphasize the gendered dimensions of slavery and unfree labor in comparative frameworks temporally and spatially, from the ancient world to the 21st century. Papers might include analyses of slave systems that connected societies across the Atlantic, Pacific or Indian oceans, trans-Saharan slavery, convict labor, sexual (including marriage) and debt slavery, or other institutions of bonded labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Capitalism

With the recent, renewed interest in the history of capitalism, we seek to open up a conversation that deepens our understanding of capitalism and its diverse role in the transformation of economies and societies across the globe.  We are particularly interested in proposals that consider how the study of women and gender can help us better understand global capitalism as an internally differentiated and interconnected, shared structure.  Proposals that join an innovative use of both quantitative and qualitative methods and evidence will be given special consideration, as will those that incorporate how historians, activists, artists, economists and others have engaged with the histories of capitalism.  We invite submissions on topics as diverse as corporate capitalism, the service economy, markets and consumption, business, the environment and development, social networks, globalization and antiglobalization, and big data.

Track chairs:

  1. Sexualities, Gender Identities and Expressions

We call for proposals that consider the question of how sex, sexualities and gender are managed and maintained across boundaries of race, class, and culture  (among others). New paths of contestation engaging the fluidity of genders and sexualities are called for in the current state of emergency surrounding issues of anti-Black racism and police brutality that have generated public protest in the United States.  Similarly, popular and state uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa (among others), have destabilized conventional hierarchies. How might these conflicts generate new models of activism, scholarship, and praxis along axes of gender identity, expression, and sexualities?  How do emergent gender identities and sexual expressions produce both antagonisms and possibilities? Papers that concern historically situated race and racism and local and transnational state violence are particularly relevant.  The Sexualities and Gender Identities and Expressions track will also consider but not be limited to: queer pedagogies; reproductive technologies and sexualities; relations among Feminist Studies/LGBTQ Studies/ Queer Studies; police states and violence; intimate partner violence; social protest; pleasure and sexual practices; trans*/national movements and movement building; political coalitions; dangerous intimacies.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

7. Women, Gender and Science

The Program Committee welcomes proposals for panels, papers, round-table discussions, or other presentations on all aspects of the history of women, gender(s), and science (including medicine and technology). We are particularly interested in creating a program that includes a range of geographic areas, historical periods, and methodologies. We welcome proposals that are interdisciplinary and intersectional, and that represent a diverse set of voices within academia and beyond including, but not limited to, those that engage visual and performing arts, science fiction, civic science, do-it-yourself experiments, computing and the Maker Movement. We especially encourage panel proposals that bring together scholars, artists, and/or practitioners around a common theme.

Track Chairs:

  1. Pedagogy and Work Culture, K-12

The Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities brings together thousands of historians, activists, educators, and artists to share their research and activism. The 2017 conference especially wants to involve teachers and teacher educators in a lively discussion of teachers’ work as well as curriculum, pedagogy, and the history of education informed by feminist, queer, Marxist, and race-based theory. We plan to partner teachers and teacher educators with academics, school activists, museum educators, librarians, and artists to explore gender and sexuality in school curricula and the life of schools and those who work there. A range of creative presentation formats—including performance-based, digital, and open forum—are encouraged.  Possible topics include:  How genders and sexuality are taught (or not taught) in the curriculum in the era of high stakes testing; Engaging social issues in K-12 curriculum (e.g., peace, suffrage, temperance, anti-lynching) that illuminate and enrich the understanding of a particular era or movement;  The gendered nature of the attack on public education, the history of women in the schools, and teacher union history; Gender and the work of teachers, including oral histories of closeted and “out” queer educators.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and War

War, as a time of dramatic rupture and change, can bring terrible suffering but also, potentially, opportunity. Wars serve to construct, fracture and challenge gender identities and gendered hierarchies. Gender, moreover, has been a mobilizing theme for both anti-war and militaristic movements. We invite innovative contributions that address topics such as the gendered dimensions of both home fronts and battle fronts; the intersections of gender, ethnicity and religious identification in war contexts; the ways that different genders and sexualities are negotiated within wartime regimes; the intersections of war, gender, science and technology; the gendered dimensions of war memory, memorialization and mourning; the gendering of wartime discourse and propaganda; and media, literary and visual representations of gender, war and conflict. Submissions may deal with any geographical area(s) and any historical era, from ancient to modern.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

10. Refugees, Asylum and Gender

Gender and sexuality have shaped the flow of people fleeing war persecution, man-made and natural catastrophes, playing a strong role not only in who flees, but also in what they experience. Additionally, as a form of forced migration, refugee migration invites juxtaposition with detention and deportation, international adoption, and human trafficking.  Thus we invite path breaking contributions that address the experiences of such coerced migrants in various  times and places, focusing on such topics as sustaining everyday life in refugee camps and in resettlement, gendered persecution (such as intimate partner violence, forced marriage, or rape) in asylum cases, gendered treatment of refugees, gendered effects of refugee and asylum policies, the gendered discourse of refugees and asylum, gendered forms of resilience and creativity,  the intersection of gender/race/culture/ability and sexuality and historic and ongoing inequity as a factor in forced migration. We especially welcome proposals that cross boundaries, creatively re-think the nature and format of presentations, and include presenters from beyond the confines of academia.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Religion

The twenty-first century has seen a revival of religion as a marker of gender difference in many parts of the globe.  Religious concepts and practices continue to be invoked to strengthen hierarchies, enforce conformity, and deny fundamental rights.  In light of those developments, submissions to Difficult Conversations on women, gender, and religion, are invited to reassess historical scholarship of the past decades that revealed competing theologies, and to question how, at this stage in history, scholars and activists may effectively advance more nuanced understandings of faith, religious systems, and the values associated with them.  Of particular interest are questions of gendered agency and authority in religion; religious “tradition” and identity; and the interplay between religion and sexuality.

Track Chairs:

  1. Performance Studies and Visual Culture

This track explores the ways in which performance and visual culture can create, interrogate, and reshape the meanings and representations of gender, sexuality, race, class, ability and other categories of identification.  Papers and presenters from any discipline that seeks to theorize and understand historical and contemporary modes of embodiment, agency, representation, and resistance are encouraged. Proposals may also incorporate short performances as a means of enhancing audience engagement with central questions about agency, representation and creation.  Presentations might use performance as an organizing framework for considering a wide range of gendered practices and relationships, including but not limited to: museums and memorials; landscapes and the built environment; food and consumption; technology and digital media; nationalism, totalitarianism, repression, and revolution; theatre and creative practices, literary production, and censorship.

Track Chairs:

  1. Politics and Popular Culture

The relationship between politics and popular culture is key to understanding women, gender, and sexualities across historical eras.  We invite submissions that critically engage the history of popular culture in any time period and locale.  Popular culture history has emerged as a vibrant field that yields new ways to study the intersections of race, gender, class, sexuality, and (dis)ability.  Submitters can take up a number of issues ranging from how and why popular culture is central to the quotidian experiences of people around the globe to its role in the shifting paradigms of feminism, body politics, critical race theory, trans studies, imperialism, transnational studies, and reproductive justice.  By centering on forms of popular cultural expression, including film, music, sports, dance, fashion, print media, social media, this track seeks to bring a diverse group of scholars, cultural producers, and practitioners into conversation with one another.

Track Chairs:

  1. Work Cultures/Work Realities: The Academy and Beyond

This track seeks individual papers, panels, or roundtable sessions on issues or themes relevant to the work we (broadly defined) do. We hope to generate informed conversation about pedagogy, but also working conditions—for those working in any capacity in higher educational institutions as well as those in other settings.  Given the service burdens in the academy that fall particularly heavily on women and people of color, how do we see that such contributions are valued?  Do we need to redefine teaching and service as intellectual endeavors?  Is it necessary to change dominant understandings of scholarship?  How would we set about doing these tasks?  These issues are particularly timely given attacks on university employees and the questions raised by politicians, parents, and students about the “value” or “utility” of history?  They are also important in light of those scholars, including public historians, public intellectuals, and digital humanists whose contributions often cannot be measured by “traditional” categories.  Other difficult conversations are to be had on how historians in various settings (schools, universities, non-profits, for-hire) can work together? We also seek to address how scholarship and work are married beyond the academy.  Can one still be a historian and work, for example, in non-academic settings.  What does it mean to be an Alt-Ac, public historian or history informed activist in 2017?

Track Chairs:

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1111/gend.2015.27.issue-1/asset/cover.gif?v=1&s=544c42b87d89d7f812a702ac1e89cfe215bf92ee

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291468-0424

 

Volume 27, Issue 2, August 2015
 

Articles:

Bodies of Evidence: Sex and Murder (or Gender and Homicide) in Early Modern England, c.1500–1680 (pages 245–262)

J. Kesselring

 

Women, ‘Usury’ and Credit in Early Modern England: The Case of the Maiden Investor (pages 263–292)

Judith M. Spicksley

 

‘Skills Proper to their Sex’: Cecilia Morillas and a New Domestic Education in Early Modern Spain (pages 293–306)

Margaret E. Boyle

 

The Pleasures of a Single Life: Envisioning Bachelorhood in Early Eighteenth-Century England (pages 307–328)

James Rosenheim

 

‘You May Bind Me, You May Beat Me, You May Even Kill Me’: Bridewealth, Consent and Conversion in Nineteenth-Century Abẹ́òkúta (in Present-day Southwest Nigeria) (pages 329–348)

Temilola Alanamu

 

Piety, Professionalism and Power: Chinese Protestant Missionary Physicians and Imperial Affiliations between Women in the Early Twentieth Century (pages 349–373)

Sarah Pripas-Kapit

 

Queering the Martial Races: Masculinity, Sex and Circumcision in the Twentieth-Century British Indian Army (pages 374–396)

Kate Imy

 

‘A Spanish Housewife is Your Next Door Neighbour’: British Women and the Spanish Civil War (pages 397–416)

Roseanna Webster

 

Dressing the Shop Window of Socialism: Gender and Consumption in the Soviet Union in the Era of ‘Cultured Trade’, 1934–53 (pages 417–445)

Philippa Hetherington

 

From ‘Mother of the Nation’ to ‘Lady Macbeth’: Winnie Mandela and Perceptions of Female Violence in South Africa, 1985–91 (pages 446–464)

Emily Bridger

 

Nirbhaya’s Body: The Politics of Protest in the Aftermath of the 2012 Delhi Gang Rape (pages 465–486)

Krupa Shandilya

 

This issue also contains abstracts and book reviews.

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Prochaine séance du séminaire : 11 juin, 17h, Les Personnes âgées

Prochaine séance du séminaire : 11 juin, 17h, Les Personnes âgées

Jeudi le 11 juin, le séminaire Genre et classes populaires, qui a pour thème cette année les “Routines,” aura le plaisir d’accueillir Valentine Trépied pour une séance autour des “personnes âgées.”

La sociologue Valentine Trépied (Centre Maurice Halbwachs, EHESS/ENS/CNRS) présentera une intervention intitulée: « Routines et dépendance, l’étiquetage des personnes âgées en EHPAD ».

Rendez-vous donc à 17h le jeudi 11 juin la salle Picard 3, entrée au 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005, escalier C, 3ème étage (la salle Picard 3 est après les portes battantes. L’entrée des bâtiments est libre, indiquez aux gardiens à la porte que vous venez pour assister à un séminaire).

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History, Printemps 2015

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

 

http://gas.sagepub.com/content/current

 

Volume 27, Number 1, Spring 2015

 

Editorial Note:

Rethinking Transnationalism and Histories of Women, Race, and Sexuality In and Between Latin America and the United States, 1870–1970

Jean Quataert, Leigh Ann Wheeler

 

Articles:

A Feisty Woman in Nineteenth-Century Mexico: Laura Méndez de Cuenca (1853–1928)

Mílada Bazant

 

Raising Pan Americans: Early Women Activists of Hemispheric Cooperation, 1916–1944

Dina Berger

 

Creating Madres Campesinas: Revolutionary Motherhood and the Gendered Politics of Nation Building in 1950s Bolivia

Nicole L. Pacino

 

Modern Kitchens in the Pampas: Home Mechanization and Domestic Work in Argentina, 1940–1970

Inés Pérez

 

“I had to Promise . . . Not to Ask ‘Nasty’ Questions Again”: African American Women and Sex and Marriage Education in the 1940s

Christina Simmons

 

Not to Rely Completely on the Courts: Florynce “Flo” Kennedy and Black Feminist Leadership in the Reproductive Rights Battle, 1969–1971

Sherie M. Randolph

 

Book Reviews

Struggles for Citizenship: Gender, Sexuality, and the State (Then and Now)

Natasha Zaretsky

 

Adoption Politics: Families, Identities, and Power

Ann S. Blum

 

Intersecting Histories of Gender, Race, and Disability

Alison M. Parker

 

Transcending Cross-Cultural Frontiers: Gender, Religion, Race, and Nation in Asia and the Near East

Mona L. Siegel

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Prochaine séance du séminaire : le 28 mai, 17h, Les concierges

Prochaine séance du séminaire : le 28 mai, 17h, Les concierges

Jeudi prochain 28 mai, le séminaire Genre et classes populaires, qui a pour thème cette année les “Routines,” aura le plaisir d’accueillir Anaïs Albert et Nimisha Barton pour une séance autour des concierges.

Anaïs Albert (historienne, Centre d’Histoire du XIXe siècle, Université Paris 1) et Nimisha Barton (historienne, Princeton University) présenteront une intervention intitulée:

« La routine comme métier : les concierges parisiens et la gestion du quotidien des classes populaires, de la Belle Époque à l’entre-deux-guerres »

Rendez-vous donc à 17h le jeudi 28 mai salle Picard 3, entrée au 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005, escalier C, 3ème étage (la salle Picard 3 est après les portes battantes. L’entrée des bâtiments est libre, indiquez aux gardiens à la porte que vous venez pour assister à un séminaire).

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

ANNULÉE: Prochaine séance du séminaire : 2 avril, 17h, Les sites de rencontre en ligne

Nous sommes contraintes d’annuler la séance de séminaire qui devait se tenir ce jeudi 2 avril autour des sites de rencontre en ligne, Marie Berström ayant un empêchement.

La Séance Annulée: [Jeudi prochain 2 avril, le séminaire Genre et classes populaires, qui a pour thème cette année les “Routines,” aura le plaisir d’accueillir Marie Bergström pour une séance autour des “sites de rencontre en ligne.”

Marie Bergström (sociologue, Observatoire sociologique du changement, Sciences Po / Université d’Oxford, Nuffield College) présentera une intervention intitulée : « Les codes sociaux et sexués de la séduction. L’exemple des sites de rencontres en ligne »

Rendez-vous donc à 17h le jeudi 2 avril salle Picard 3, entrée au 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005, escalier C, 3ème étage (la salle Picard 3 est après les portes battantes. L’entrée des bâtiments est libre, indiquez aux gardiens à la porte que vous venez pour assister à un séminaire).]

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Prochaine séance du séminaire : 26 mars, 17h, Les Miss

Jeudi prochain 26 mars, le séminaire Genre et classes populaires, qui a pour thème cette année les “Routines,” aura le plaisir d’accueillir Camille Couvry pour une séance autour des “Miss.”

Camille Couvry (sociologue, Dynamiques sociales et Langagières, Université de Rouen) présentera une intervention intitulée : « L’expérience des élections de Miss et l’apprentissage de techniques du corps : acquisition durable de pratiques considérées comme “féminines” par les participantes ? »

Rendez-vous donc à 17h le jeudi 26 mars salle Picard 3, entrée au 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005, escalier C, 3ème étage (la salle Picard 3 est après les portes battantes. L’entrée des bâtiments est libre, indiquez aux gardiens à la porte que vous venez pour assister à un séminaire).

 

Si vous avez manqué la séance sur la construction de la masculinité sportive avec Nicolas Damont et Manuel Schotté, n’hésitez pas à écouter les interventions en podcast sur le carnet.

Film, livre et conférences dans les dernières nouveautés, et, une fois n’est pas coutume, pour finir, et vous donner envie de lire, laissons la parole à Georges Pérec dont les mots résonnent tout particulièrement avec nos questionnements :
 » Ce qui se passe chaque jour et qui revient chaque jour, le banal, le quotidien, l’évident, le commun, l’ordinaire, l’infra-ordinaire, le bruit de fond, l’habituel, comment en rendre compte, comment l’interroger, comment le décrire ? »

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

À Noter : Mise à jour des séances du Séminaire Genre et Classes Populaires

 

À Noter : Mise à jour des séances du Séminaire Genre et Classes Populaires

 

Le séminaire genre et classes populaires annonce qu’on inverse les séances du 26 mars et du 2 avril. Le programme est donc désormais le suivant:

 

Le 26 mars : Les Miss (17h-19h)

Camille Couvry (sociologue, Dynamiques sociales et Langagières, Université de Rouen)

« L’expérience des élections de Miss et l’apprentissage de techniques du corps : acquisition durable de pratiques considérées comme “féminines” par les participantes ? »

 

Le 2 avril : Les sites de rencontre en ligne (17h-19h)

Marie Bergström (sociologue, Observatoire sociologique du changement, Sciences Po / Université d’Oxford, Nuffield College)

« Les codes sociaux et sexués de la séduction. L’exemple des sites de rencontres en ligne »

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society

 

 http://gas.sagepub.com/content/current

 

February 2015; 29 (1)

 

Introduction

Orit Avishai, Afshan Jafar, and Rachel Rinaldo

A Gender Lens on Religion

 

Articles

Lynne Gerber

Grit, Guts, and Vanilla Beans: Godly Masculinity in the Ex-Gay Movement

 

Pamela J. Prickett

Negotiating Gendered Religious Space: The Particularities of Patriarchy in an African American Mosque

 

Tanya Zion-Waldoks

Politics of Devoted Resistance: Agency, Feminism, and Religion among Orthodox Agunah Activists in Israel

 

Ayesha Khurshid

Islamic Traditions of Modernity: Gender, Class, and Islam in a Transnational Women’s Education Project

 

Kristin Aune

Feminist Spirituality as Lived Religion: How UK Feminists Forge Religio-spiritual Lives

 

 

Book Reviews

 

Dina Pinsky

Book Review: The Moral Panics of Sexuality edited by Breanne Fahs, Mary L. Dudy, and Sarah Stage

 

Özlem Altiok

Book Review: Gendered Identities: Criticizing Patriarchy in Turkey edited by Rasim Özgür Dönmez and Fazilet Ahu Özmen

 

Mimi Schippers

Book Review: The Polyamorists Next Door: Inside Multiple-Partner Relationships and Families by Elisabeth Sheff

 

David J. Maume

Book Review: Unfinished Business: Paid Family Leave in California and the Future of U.S. Work-Family Policy by Ruth Milkman and Eileen Appelbaum

 

Lynn Davidman

Book Review: God’s Gangs: Barrio Ministry, Masculinity, and Gang Recovery by Edward Orozco Flores

 

Pallavi Banerjee

Book Review: Pregnant on Arrival: Making the Illegal Immigrant by Eithne Luibhéid

 

Amy L. Best

Book Review: Consuming Work: Youth Labor in America by Yasemin Besen-Cassino

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gend.2014.26.issue-3/issuetoc

November 2014; 26 (3)

Articles

Introduction: Gender, Imperialism and Global Exchanges (pages 393–413)

Michele Mitchell and Naoko Shibusawa with Stephan F. Miescher

 

Labour

The Sexual Politics of Imperial Expansion: Eunuchs and Indirect Colonial Rule in Mid-Nineteenth-Century North India

Jessica Hinchy

Remaking Anglo-Indian Men: Agricultural Labour as Remedy in the British Empire, 1908–38

Jane McCabe

 

‘Robot Farmers’ and Cosmopolitan Workers: Technological Masculinity and Agricultural Development in the French Soudan (Mali), 1945–68

Laura Ann Twagira

 

Commodities

Pursuing Her Profits: Women in Jamaica, Atlantic Slavery and a Globalising Market, 1700–60

Christine Walker

 

Fashioning their Place: Dress and Global Imagination in Imperial Sudan

Marie Grace Brown

 

The Transnational Homophile Movement and the Development of Domesticity in Mexico City’s Homosexual Community, 1930–70

Víctor M. Macías-González

 

Fashioning Politics

 

Dressed for Success: Hegemonic Masculinity, Elite Men and Westernisation in Iran, c.1900–40

Sivan Balslev

 

‘It Gave Us Our Nationality’: US Education, the Politics of Dress and Transnational Filipino Student Networks, 1901–45

Sarah Steinbock-Pratt

 

‘A Life of Make-Believe’: Being Boy Scouts and ‘Playing Indian’ in British Malaya (1910–42)

Jialin Christina Wu

 

The Tank Driver who Ran with Poodles: US Visions of Israeli Soldiers and the Cold War Liberal Consensus, 1958–79

Shaul Mitelpunkt

 

Mobility and Activism

Marta Vergara, Popular-Front Pan-American Feminism and the Transnational Struggle for Working Women’s Rights in the 1930s

Katherine M. Marino

 

Guerrilla Ganja Gun Girls: Policing Black Revolutionaries from Notting Hill to Laventille

W. Chris Johnson

 

Gender and Visuality: Identification Photographs, Respectability and Personhood in Colonial Southern Africa in the 1920s and 1930s (pages 688–708)

Lorena Rizzo

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Annulation de la séance du jeudi 22 janvier avec Catherine Négroni

Malheureusement, Catherine Négroni doit annuler son intervention dans notre séminaire ce jeudi 22 janvier.

Nous nous retrouvons donc le 12 février à 17h pour une séance autour des sportifs avec Manuel Schotté et Nicolas Damont (voir programme).

 

Pour la deuxième séance du séminaire Genre et Classes Populaires sur le thème “routine-s”, nous avons le plaisir de recevoir Catherine Négroni qui viendra nous parler du quotidien du travail prostitutionnel.

Jeudi 22 janvier : Les prostituées (17h-19h)

Catherine Négroni (sociologue, Centre lillois d’études et de recherches sociologiques et économiques, Université Lille 1/CNRS)

« Vivre au quotidien le travail prostitutionnel : parcours de prostituées, transsexuelles, migrantes »

 

Les séances se déroulent le jeudi à partir de 17h, à l’Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne et sont composées d’un.e discutant.e et d’un.e ou deux intervenant.e.s autour d’une sous-thématique commune.

Le séminaire a lieu en salle Picard 3, entrée au 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005, escalier C, 3ème étage, la salle Picard 3 est après les portes battantes. L’entrée des bâtiments est libre, indiquez aux gardiens à la porte que vous venez pour assister à un séminaire.

Voir  le programme du séminaire 2014/2015 sur le thème “Routine-s” ici: http://gcp.hypotheses.org/1983

 

Catherine Négroni: http://clerse.univ-lille1.fr/spip.php?article180

Négroni Catherine, Cardon P., 2013, « Enfance, famille et intervention publique : au prisme du parcours biographique », Recherches familiales, n° 10, p. 70-74

Négroni Catherine, 2013, « Parcours migratoires de prostituées équatoriennes transsexuelles », Migrations et Sociétés, vol. 25, n° 145, janvier-février, p. 153-166

Négroni Catherine, 2013, « Réflexivité et accompagnement des parcours de formation en reconversion professionnelle à l’université », in « Formation et réflexivité : les pratiques relationnelles et la question technique », La revue Les sciences de l’éducation pour l’ère nouvelle, numéro coordonné par Philippe Mazereau et Béatrice Savarieau, vol. 46, p. 21-40

Négroni Catherine, 2013, « La latence, concept clé des bifurcations professionnelles : approcher la prise de décision à travers une analyse du récit et du statut de la parole des individus », in Ch. Niewiadomski et Ch. Delory Momberger (dir.), Territoires contemporains de la recherche bio-graphique, Teraedre, p.

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_womens_history/toc/jowh.26.4.html

Volume 26, Number 4, Winter 2014

 

Editorial Note:

Making, Shaping, and Resisting Nations in the Twentieth Century: Women in Australia, Occupied Japan, and Postwar United States and Canada

Jean Quataert, Leigh Ann Wheeler

 

Articles:

“A Splendid Object Lesson”: A Transnational Perspective on the Birth of the Australian Nation

Clare Wright

 

Aboriginal Women in Australia’s Traveling Shows, 1930s–1950s: Shadows and Suggestions

Kathryn Hunter

 

Modern Butterfly: American Perceptions of Japanese Women and their Role in International Relations, 1945–1960

Meghan Warner Mettler

 

Beauty, Soft Power, and the Politics of Womanhood During the U.S. Occupation of Japan, 1945–1952

Malia McAndrew

 

Maternalism and the Mayor: Dottie Do-Good’s War on Sin in Postwar Portland

Sarah Koenig

 

Ungodly Grandmother: Marian Sherman and the Social Dimensions of Atheism in Postwar Canada

Tina Block

 

Reviews

Legal History and the Politics of Inclusion

Felice Batlan

 

Women and Fashion

Linda Simon

 

Scouts, Tomboys, and the History of Girls and Girlhood

Amanda H. Littauer

 

Sisters’ History Is Women’s History: The American Context

Margaret Susan Thompson

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Good and Mad Women: Histories of Gender, Then, and Now

Call for Papers

“Australian Women’s History Network Symposium 2015

Good and Mad Women: Histories of Gender, Then and Now

 

Just over three decades ago, Jill Julius Matthews published Good and Mad Women: The historical construction of femininity in twentieth century Australia (1984), her path-breaking feminist history. This important book pre-dated Joan W. Scott’s proclamation of gender as a ‘useful category of historical analysis’ (1986) and continues to be influential. The Australian Women’s History Network celebrates the book’s anniversary by calling for papers that historicise gender and/ or reflect on the historiography of gender. In particular we seek work that aims to trace and analyse – as Matthews did in Good and Mad Women – ‘the specific meaning and experience of becoming a woman’, whether in twentieth century Australia or elsewhere in time and place. ‪The symposium also offers a platform for speakers – individually or on panels – to revisit classic works of gender history, examining how these were foundational and for whom, or to survey contemporary currents in gender history.

The AWHN welcomes broad engagement with the field of gender history; other possible topics and themes include:

–          Gender and sexualities

–          Gender in cross-cultural comparison

–          Gender, politics and resistance

–          Transgender

–          Feminist critiques of gender

–          Gender and embodiment

–          Gender, race and ethnicity

–          Men and masculinities

–          Gender and pleasure

–          Class and gender

–          Gender and colonialism; gender and nationalism.

The AWHN Symposium will be held on Wednesday 8 July as part of the 2015 Australian Historical Association conference ‘Foundational Histories’ to be held at the University of Sydney 6-10 July 2015. The keynote speaker will be Professor Jill Matthews. The annual general meeting will be held at lunch time with a reception and dinner to follow the symposium.

Please submit abstracts of no more than 200 words (for individual papers and panels) to the symposium convenor Zora Simic <z.simic@unsw.edu.au> by 28 February 2015. Please send as word or RTF files with an author bio of no more than 50 words.

Papers that are not selected as part of the AWHN program will be considered for the AHA program.

Each paper will run for twenty minutes with ten minutes for question time. Panels are allocated 90 minutes in total.”

 

The Australian Women’s History Network is convened by Sharon Crozier-de Rosa (University of Wollongong), Vera Mackie (University of Wollongong) and Zora Simic (University of New South Wales).

 

The Network can be contacted at

<auswhn@gmail.com>

or

Australian Women’s History Network

c/o Professor Vera Mackie

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts

University of Wollongong

Wollongong, NSW, 2522

<http://www.auswhn.org.au/>

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization, November 2014

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender, Work & Organization, November 2014

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gwao.2014.21.issue-6/issuetoc 

November 2014; 21 (6)

Le Sommaire:

The Social Dynamics Channelling Latina College Graduates into the Teaching Profession (pages 491–515)

Glenda M. Flores and Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

 

Cultural Correlates of Gender Integration in Science (pages 516–530)

Cindy L. Cain and Erin Leahey

 

Gendered Constructions of Leadership in Danish Job Advertisements (pages 531–545)

Inger Askehave and Karen Korning Zethsen

 

‘Dirt, Death and Danger? I Don’t Recall Any Adverse Reaction …’: Masculinity and the Taint Management of Hospital Private Security Work (pages 546–558)

Matthew S. Johnston and Edwin Hodge

 

Reflexivity and the Construction of Competing Discourses of Masculinity in a Female-Dominated Profession (pages 559–572)

Maria Adamson

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society, December 2014

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society, December 2014

 

http://gas.sagepub.com/content/28/6.toc

December 2014; 28 (6)

 

Le Sommaire:

Articles

Krista M. Brumley

The Gendered Ideal Worker Narrative: Professional Women’s and Men’s Work Experiences in the New Economy at a Mexican Company

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 799-823, first published on August 19, 2014

 

Rachel Rinaldo

Pious and Critical: Muslim Women Activists and the Question of Agency

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 824-846, first published on September 9, 2014

 

Catherine Bolzendahl

Opportunities and Expectations: The Gendered Organization of Legislative Committees in Germany, Sweden, and the United States

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 847-876, first published on August 1, 2014

 

Éléonore Lépinard

Doing Intersectionality: Repertoires of Feminist Practices in France and Canada

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 877-903, first published on July 25, 2014

 

Kristin Natalier and Belinda Hewitt

Separated Parents Reproducing and Undoing Gender Through Defining Legitimate Uses of Child Support

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 904-925, first published on August 19, 2014

 

Book Reviews

Bethany L. Brown

Book Review: Into the Fire: Disaster and the Remaking of Gender by Shelley Pacholok

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 926-928, first published on March 13, 2014

 

Jennifer L. Martin

Book Review: The Rise of Women: The Growing Gender Gap in Education and What It Means for American Schools by Thomas A. Diprete and Claudia Buchmann

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 928-929, first published on March 18, 2014

 

Kylie Parrotta

Book Review: Sexual Minorities in Sports: Prejudice at Play edited by Melanie L. Sartore-Baldwin

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 930-932, first published on March 21, 2014

 

Marybeth C. Stalp

Book Review: The Marginalized Majority: Media Representation and Lived Experiences of Single Women by Kristie Collins

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 932-934, first published on March 17, 2014

 

Catherine Mobley

Book Review: Our Roots Run Deep as Ironweed: Appalachian Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice by Shannon Elizabeth Bell

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 934-936, first published on April 25, 2014

 

Laura S. Logan

Book Review: Compassionate Confinement: A Year in the Life of Unit C by Laura S. Abrams and Ben Andersen-Nathe

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 936-938, first published on April 25, 2014

 

Laura V. Heston

Book Review: Queering Marriage: Challenging Family Formation in the United States by Katrina Kimport

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 938-940, first published on April 22, 2014

 

Emily S. Mann

Book Review: Amigas y Amantes: Sexually Nonconforming Latinas Negotiate Family by Katie L. Acosta

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 940-942, first published on June 23, 2014

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn