Sortie du dernier numéro de Gender & History

Sortie du dernier numéro de Gender & History

The 2012 Spring issue of Gender & History is now available online. The contents include:

Volume 24, Issue 1

ARTICLES:

The Boundaries of Women’s Power: Gender and the Discourse of Political Friendship in Twelfth-Century England (pages 1–17) by Rebecca Slitt

 

Friendly Relations: Situating Friendships Between Men and Women in the Early American Republic, 1780–1830 (pages 18–34) by Cassandra A. Good

 

Proving One’s Manliness: Masculine Self-perceptions of Austrian Deserters in the Second World War (pages 35–55) by Maria Fritsche

 

Regulating Body Boundaries and Health during the Second World War: Nationalist Discourse, Media Representations and the Experiences of Canadian Women War Workers (pages 56–73) by Helen E. Smith and Pamela Wakewich

 

‘The World is Our Campus’: Michigan State University and Cold-War Home Economics in US-occupied Okinawa, 1945–1972 (pages 74–92) by Mire Koikari

 

An Army of Educators: Gender, Revolution and the Cuban Literacy Campaign of 1961 (pages 93–111) by Rebecca Herman

 

Male Saints and Devotional Masculinity in Late Medieval England (pages 112–133) by Katherine J. Lewis

 

Describing the Female Sculptor in Early Modern Italy: An Analysis of the vita of Properzia de’ Rossi in Giorgio Vasari’s Lives (pages 134–149) by Sally Quin

 

The Courtesan Tale: Female Musicians and Dancers in Mughal Historical Chronicles, c.1556–1748 (pages 150–171)by Katherine Butler Schofield

 

Muscles, Nerves, and Sex: The Contradictions of the Medical Approach to Female Bodies in Movement in France, 1847–1914 (pages 172–186)by Grégory Quin and Anaïs Bohuon

 

Unattached and Unhinged: The Spinster and the Psychiatrist in Liberal Italy, 1860–1922 (pages 187–204) by Linda Reeder

 

Coming of Age: Law, Sex and Childhood in Late Colonial India (pages 205–230) by Ishita Pande

 

BOOK REVIEWS:

Intersections of Gender, Religion and Ethnicity in the Middle Ages edited by Cordelia Beattie and Kirsten A. Fenton (pages 231–232)

 

Gender and Scientific Discourse in Early Modern Culture edited by Kathleen P. Long (pages 232–234)

 

Gender and Justice: Violence, Intimacy, and Community in Fin-de-Siècle Paris by Eliza Earle Ferguson (pages 234–235)

 

Rousseau’s Daughters: Domesticity, Education, and Autonomy in Modern France by Jennifer L. Popiel (pages 235–236)

 

Mates and Lovers: A Gay History of New Zealand by Chris Brickell (pages 236–238)

Working Out Egypt: Effendi Masculinity and Subject Formation in Colonial Modernity, 1870–1940 by Wilson Chacko Jacob (pages 238–240)

 

Conceiving Citizens: Women and the Politics of Motherhood in Iran by Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet (pages 240–241)

 

Managing the Body: Beauty, Health, and Fitness in Britain, 1880–1939 by Ina Zweiniger-Bargielowska  Beauty Imagined: A History of the Global Beauty Industry by Geoffrey Jones (pages 241–244)

 

BIOGRAPHIES (pages 245–246)

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn


A propos Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.