Archives du mot-clé femmes

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

https://muse.jhu.edu/

 

Volume 28, Issue 3, Fall 2016


Editorial Note

“Changing Feminist Paradigms and Cultural Encounters: Women’s Experiences in Ottoman and Post-Ottoman History in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries”

Elisa Camiscioli, Jean H. Quataert, Benita Roth

 

Articles

Introduction

Gülhan Balsoy

 

“They can breathe freely now”: The International Council of Women and Ottoman Muslim Women (1893–1920s)

Nicole A.N.M. van Os

 

National and Transnational Dynamics of Women’s Activism in Turkey in the 1950s and 1960s: The Story of the ICW Branch in Ankara

Umut Azak, Henk de Smaele

 

Transcultural Encounters: Discourses on Women’s Rights and Feminist Interventions in the Ottoman Empire, Greece, and Turkey from the Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Interwar Period

Efi Kanner

 

Women’s Migration for Prostitution in the interwar Middle East and North Africa

Liat Kozma

 

Toxic Murder, Female Poisoners, and the Question of Agency at the Late Ottoman Law Courts, 1840–1908

Ebru Aykut

 

The Uncertainties of Freedom: The Second Constitutional Era and the End of Slavery in the Late Ottoman Empire

Ceyda Karamursel

 

Maternal Colonialism and Turkish Woman’s Burden in Dersim: Educating the “Mountain Flowers” of Dersim

Zeynep Turkyilmaz

Save

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History, Vol. 28, No. 2

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History
https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/33651

Volume 28, Issue 2, Summer 2016

Articles
On Women’s Bodies: Experience of Dehumanization during the Holocaust
Nicole Ephgrave

Cadres, Grain, and Sexual Abuse in Wuwei County, Mao’s China
Bin Yang and Shuji Cao

Speech, Sex, and Mobility: Norwegian Women in a Late Nineteenth-Century « English-speaking » Settler Colony
Nadia Rhook

From Sperm Runners to Sperm Banks: Lesbians, Assisted Conception, and Challenging the Fertility Industry, 1971 – 1983
Katie Batza

Baby M: American Feminists Repond to a Controversial Case
Joyce Peterson

The Material Culture of Childbirth in Late Medieval London and its Suburbs
Katherine French

Book Reviews

Historicizing Gender, Medicine, and Biopolitics
Okezi T. Otovo

Early Modern Prostitutes, Concubines, and Mistresses
Yasuko Sato

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à Communications: Women and Labour Activism in a Transnational Context

Appel à Communications: Women and Labour Activism in a Transnational Context

International Symposium

Newcastle University, 15-16 April 2016

In her 2014 work, Writing History in the Global Era, Lynn Hunt asks if globalization really is the new theory that will invigorate history. Since ‘the global turn’ it remains to be seen if more opportunities have been created to explore ways of including women in political, social and cultural history and in particular that of Labour history.

In order to investigate the impact of transnationalism on the visibility of women’s activism in the past, Claudia Baldoli and Máire Cross would like to invite proposals for research papers to be presented in an international conference that will bring together research groups of the North east including North East Labour History, Newcastle and Northumbria Universities Labour and Society Research Group, Newcastle University Gender Research Group.

Transnational approaches to the history of women in labour activism:

From Mary Wollstonecraft to 2014 Nobel Peace winner Malala Yousafzai: this two-day conference aims to discuss the effect of transnational approaches and the current polemical issues of the field, and to promote findings in new research on women’s engagement from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century, from individual to collective movements, in specific revolutionary moments and over several generations, in local and international associations, in particular where Labour activism intersects with other political, religious and cultural aspects of women’s activism.

 

Possible topics include: Women and strikes; Women in political movements, trades unions and NGOs; Women and political violence; Relationship between different generations of women activists; Pacifist women; Women involved in resistance movements; Women activists in exile; Biographical approaches to women activists; Political transitions in a life time of activism (for example in relation to peace and war, internationalism and nationalism, socialism and fascism, anti-colonialism and independence); Women activists in religious-social movements; Images of Women and Labour in cultural production; Women activists as writers, film makers, reporters.

We are interested in women’s roles as both political activists and intellectuals across borders and generations; on women’s biographies, both of lone women activists and of collective groups, of key figures as well as obscure ones, and on the role of biographies in establishing activist women’s reputations. We also welcome reflections on the methodology of activism and on problems inherent to the use of archives. We are keen to include researchers at all stages of their career. There may be limited funding to assist postgraduates whose papers are accepted.

Our invited keynote speaker is Susan Zimmermann, University Professor, Central European University, Budapest, specialist of international gender politics, labour women’s transnational activism, women’s work, and the ILO (http://people.ceu.edu/susan_zimmermann).

Please submit a 200 word proposal and CV by 31 January 2015 to:

EITHER Dr Claudia Baldoli, Senior Lecturer in European History, claudia.baldoli@ncl.ac.uk

OR Professor Máire Cross, Head of French, m.f.cross@ncl.ac.uk

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Call for Papers

Difficult Conversations: Thinking and Talking about Women,
Genders, and Sexualities Inside and Outside the Academy
at Hofstra University, Hempstead NY
June 1-4, 2017

The deadline for submission of proposals for individual papers, panels, and other sessions is January 15, 2016.  All proposals must be submitted electronically via the Berkshire Conference website. (http://2017berkshireconference.hofstra.edu/call-for-papers/#instructions). This site will be available for submissions from August 1, 2015 to January 15, 2016. As part of the submission process, you will be asked to select the Theme Track, or subject area, in which you would like your proposal considered. Your proposal will then be forwarded to the appropriate Track Chair.

Themed Tracks

From those listed below, please identify the subject area in which you wish to have your proposal considered. Note: Several divisions include suggested themes for exploration. These suggestions do not preclude proposals on other topics.  Questions about tracks should be directed to track co-chairs.

  1. Gender and the State: Majorities and Minorities

The state is present in gendered debates on the rights and obligations of citizenship, the provision of social welfare, governance and control, hierarchy and fealty, discrimination and marginalization. State power and also state violence are expressed differentially according to gender, with reference to legal status, reproductive rights, marriage, death, and an individual’s inclusion in the polity. Proposals might explore some of the following questions: How are gendered experiences and identities shaped by the state, and how do the demands of sexual, racial, ethnic, religious, and indigenous minorities shape state practices and institutions? How does power circulate between majorities and minorities, and how is difference, subordination, and subjecthood produced by the state, and also challenged by non-dominant communities? Specific examples might also refer to legal equality and legal status; struggles for suffrage; reproductive, human, and migrant rights; and the regulation of gendered forms of labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Social Justice, Migration and the City

Cities – as spatial forms, economic entities, and human habitats – are dynamic hubs where identity, social relations, power, inequality, and social change are visible and contested in the natural, built, and human environment, in memories and artifacts of the past, and the present. Movements of people searching for better lives and for greater opportunities, fleeing persecution and violence, or just escaping the confines of their previous lives, often end up in cities. Whether segregated or intermingled, people from different regions and different parts of the world negotiate space and identity, fight for justice and create change. We invite proposals from historians and interdisciplinary scholars working on different geographical areas, or transnationally, that explore some aspect of the historical role that migrants, migration and urban space have played in advancing both inequality and freedom, in incubating struggles for social justice and change.

Proposals in this track are encouraged to consider the following questions: how migration and mobility have impacted economic, social, cultural and political relations and formations; how the city as a spatial form influences perceptions about poverty and wealth, citizenship, social control and the nation of freedom; how global forces, markets and privatization create and/or shape urban spaces and people’s lives; how inequalities manifest in urban spaces and through institutions such as housing, employment, and education; how cities shape notions of community and belonging, identity, access and exclusion; and how urban (suburban and ex-urban) environments structure organizing, grassroots activism and social justice agendas

Track Chairs:

  1. Globalized Labor

Examining women’s labor from a global perspective offers many possibilities to consider historical specificity, women’s migration, political involvement, and transnational social movements, as well as the multiple ways in which women’s labor shapes and is shaped by broader political and economic processes. It also examines how women’s labor has defined global circuits, labor demands, and transnational labor, especially in regards to intimate labor, care-giving, outsourcing life (surrogacy), lack of documentation, and informal economies.  By the same token, we are interested in papers that look at how women have organized to challenge women’s disenfranchisement and oppression within globalized systems of labor and production.

We invite proposals from historians of different geographical areas, transnational scholars, as well as activists that address the following areas: women and transatlantic/transpacific migration; trafficking and forced labor; neoliberalism and labor migration; subcontracted labor; guest workers; the informal sector; women entrepreneurs; the gender pay gap; women’s labor and climate change; segregated labor markets; international labor organizing; women’s labor and social reproduction; transnational families and women’s work; surrogate motherhood and transnational adoption; women’s labor and free trade policy; the wages for housework movement; working class/labor movements; transnational social movements; the International Labour Organization (ILO) and women’s labor; labor legislation/protective legislation and women workers.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

  4. Slavery and Other Forms of Unfree Labor

We invite historians, activists, and others who are interested in examining how systems of unfree labor shaped lived experiences in “free” and “unfree” societies from ancient times to the twenty-first century. Slavery configured the geographic landscape of all who came into contact with it and connected societies economically, especially as global capitalism developed rapidly.  As a result of slavery’s commodification, systems of inequality were established that still linger.  We hope that the panel presentations offered will provide deep analyses of slavery, push forward new methodological approaches, broaden historiographical borders that have surrounded the subject, and advance new questions about the historical legacies of unfree labor.  We are especially interested in receiving proposals that emphasize the gendered dimensions of slavery and unfree labor in comparative frameworks temporally and spatially, from the ancient world to the 21st century. Papers might include analyses of slave systems that connected societies across the Atlantic, Pacific or Indian oceans, trans-Saharan slavery, convict labor, sexual (including marriage) and debt slavery, or other institutions of bonded labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Capitalism

With the recent, renewed interest in the history of capitalism, we seek to open up a conversation that deepens our understanding of capitalism and its diverse role in the transformation of economies and societies across the globe.  We are particularly interested in proposals that consider how the study of women and gender can help us better understand global capitalism as an internally differentiated and interconnected, shared structure.  Proposals that join an innovative use of both quantitative and qualitative methods and evidence will be given special consideration, as will those that incorporate how historians, activists, artists, economists and others have engaged with the histories of capitalism.  We invite submissions on topics as diverse as corporate capitalism, the service economy, markets and consumption, business, the environment and development, social networks, globalization and antiglobalization, and big data.

Track chairs:

  1. Sexualities, Gender Identities and Expressions

We call for proposals that consider the question of how sex, sexualities and gender are managed and maintained across boundaries of race, class, and culture  (among others). New paths of contestation engaging the fluidity of genders and sexualities are called for in the current state of emergency surrounding issues of anti-Black racism and police brutality that have generated public protest in the United States.  Similarly, popular and state uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa (among others), have destabilized conventional hierarchies. How might these conflicts generate new models of activism, scholarship, and praxis along axes of gender identity, expression, and sexualities?  How do emergent gender identities and sexual expressions produce both antagonisms and possibilities? Papers that concern historically situated race and racism and local and transnational state violence are particularly relevant.  The Sexualities and Gender Identities and Expressions track will also consider but not be limited to: queer pedagogies; reproductive technologies and sexualities; relations among Feminist Studies/LGBTQ Studies/ Queer Studies; police states and violence; intimate partner violence; social protest; pleasure and sexual practices; trans*/national movements and movement building; political coalitions; dangerous intimacies.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

7. Women, Gender and Science

The Program Committee welcomes proposals for panels, papers, round-table discussions, or other presentations on all aspects of the history of women, gender(s), and science (including medicine and technology). We are particularly interested in creating a program that includes a range of geographic areas, historical periods, and methodologies. We welcome proposals that are interdisciplinary and intersectional, and that represent a diverse set of voices within academia and beyond including, but not limited to, those that engage visual and performing arts, science fiction, civic science, do-it-yourself experiments, computing and the Maker Movement. We especially encourage panel proposals that bring together scholars, artists, and/or practitioners around a common theme.

Track Chairs:

  1. Pedagogy and Work Culture, K-12

The Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities brings together thousands of historians, activists, educators, and artists to share their research and activism. The 2017 conference especially wants to involve teachers and teacher educators in a lively discussion of teachers’ work as well as curriculum, pedagogy, and the history of education informed by feminist, queer, Marxist, and race-based theory. We plan to partner teachers and teacher educators with academics, school activists, museum educators, librarians, and artists to explore gender and sexuality in school curricula and the life of schools and those who work there. A range of creative presentation formats—including performance-based, digital, and open forum—are encouraged.  Possible topics include:  How genders and sexuality are taught (or not taught) in the curriculum in the era of high stakes testing; Engaging social issues in K-12 curriculum (e.g., peace, suffrage, temperance, anti-lynching) that illuminate and enrich the understanding of a particular era or movement;  The gendered nature of the attack on public education, the history of women in the schools, and teacher union history; Gender and the work of teachers, including oral histories of closeted and “out” queer educators.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and War

War, as a time of dramatic rupture and change, can bring terrible suffering but also, potentially, opportunity. Wars serve to construct, fracture and challenge gender identities and gendered hierarchies. Gender, moreover, has been a mobilizing theme for both anti-war and militaristic movements. We invite innovative contributions that address topics such as the gendered dimensions of both home fronts and battle fronts; the intersections of gender, ethnicity and religious identification in war contexts; the ways that different genders and sexualities are negotiated within wartime regimes; the intersections of war, gender, science and technology; the gendered dimensions of war memory, memorialization and mourning; the gendering of wartime discourse and propaganda; and media, literary and visual representations of gender, war and conflict. Submissions may deal with any geographical area(s) and any historical era, from ancient to modern.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

10. Refugees, Asylum and Gender

Gender and sexuality have shaped the flow of people fleeing war persecution, man-made and natural catastrophes, playing a strong role not only in who flees, but also in what they experience. Additionally, as a form of forced migration, refugee migration invites juxtaposition with detention and deportation, international adoption, and human trafficking.  Thus we invite path breaking contributions that address the experiences of such coerced migrants in various  times and places, focusing on such topics as sustaining everyday life in refugee camps and in resettlement, gendered persecution (such as intimate partner violence, forced marriage, or rape) in asylum cases, gendered treatment of refugees, gendered effects of refugee and asylum policies, the gendered discourse of refugees and asylum, gendered forms of resilience and creativity,  the intersection of gender/race/culture/ability and sexuality and historic and ongoing inequity as a factor in forced migration. We especially welcome proposals that cross boundaries, creatively re-think the nature and format of presentations, and include presenters from beyond the confines of academia.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Religion

The twenty-first century has seen a revival of religion as a marker of gender difference in many parts of the globe.  Religious concepts and practices continue to be invoked to strengthen hierarchies, enforce conformity, and deny fundamental rights.  In light of those developments, submissions to Difficult Conversations on women, gender, and religion, are invited to reassess historical scholarship of the past decades that revealed competing theologies, and to question how, at this stage in history, scholars and activists may effectively advance more nuanced understandings of faith, religious systems, and the values associated with them.  Of particular interest are questions of gendered agency and authority in religion; religious “tradition” and identity; and the interplay between religion and sexuality.

Track Chairs:

  1. Performance Studies and Visual Culture

This track explores the ways in which performance and visual culture can create, interrogate, and reshape the meanings and representations of gender, sexuality, race, class, ability and other categories of identification.  Papers and presenters from any discipline that seeks to theorize and understand historical and contemporary modes of embodiment, agency, representation, and resistance are encouraged. Proposals may also incorporate short performances as a means of enhancing audience engagement with central questions about agency, representation and creation.  Presentations might use performance as an organizing framework for considering a wide range of gendered practices and relationships, including but not limited to: museums and memorials; landscapes and the built environment; food and consumption; technology and digital media; nationalism, totalitarianism, repression, and revolution; theatre and creative practices, literary production, and censorship.

Track Chairs:

  1. Politics and Popular Culture

The relationship between politics and popular culture is key to understanding women, gender, and sexualities across historical eras.  We invite submissions that critically engage the history of popular culture in any time period and locale.  Popular culture history has emerged as a vibrant field that yields new ways to study the intersections of race, gender, class, sexuality, and (dis)ability.  Submitters can take up a number of issues ranging from how and why popular culture is central to the quotidian experiences of people around the globe to its role in the shifting paradigms of feminism, body politics, critical race theory, trans studies, imperialism, transnational studies, and reproductive justice.  By centering on forms of popular cultural expression, including film, music, sports, dance, fashion, print media, social media, this track seeks to bring a diverse group of scholars, cultural producers, and practitioners into conversation with one another.

Track Chairs:

  1. Work Cultures/Work Realities: The Academy and Beyond

This track seeks individual papers, panels, or roundtable sessions on issues or themes relevant to the work we (broadly defined) do. We hope to generate informed conversation about pedagogy, but also working conditions—for those working in any capacity in higher educational institutions as well as those in other settings.  Given the service burdens in the academy that fall particularly heavily on women and people of color, how do we see that such contributions are valued?  Do we need to redefine teaching and service as intellectual endeavors?  Is it necessary to change dominant understandings of scholarship?  How would we set about doing these tasks?  These issues are particularly timely given attacks on university employees and the questions raised by politicians, parents, and students about the “value” or “utility” of history?  They are also important in light of those scholars, including public historians, public intellectuals, and digital humanists whose contributions often cannot be measured by “traditional” categories.  Other difficult conversations are to be had on how historians in various settings (schools, universities, non-profits, for-hire) can work together? We also seek to address how scholarship and work are married beyond the academy.  Can one still be a historian and work, for example, in non-academic settings.  What does it mean to be an Alt-Ac, public historian or history informed activist in 2017?

Track Chairs:

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Journée d’étude, Que fait le genre à l’histoire du XIXe siècle?, EHESS, 12-13 octobre

Journée(s) d’étude

Que fait le genre à l’histoire du XIXe siècle?

EHESS – Salles 638-640 – 190-198, avenue de France – 75013 Paris
Depuis maintenant près d’une quarantaine d’années, l’histoire des femmes et, plus récemment, les études de genre ont ouvert des perspectives nouvelles dans l’ensemble des sciences humaines et sociales, et contribué à y faire évoluer les méthodes d’enquête. Les 12 et 13 octobre 2015, deux journées d’études prendront appui sur le travail des historien-ne-s pour proposer, autour d’un cas concret – celui des croisements entre rapports de genre et rapports coloniaux dans la France du XIXe siècle – une réflexion interdisciplinaire sur les apports heuristiques des concepts de genre et d’intersectionnalité. Leurs organisatrices, Elizabeth Claire (CRH), Caroline Fayolle (Paris 8), Lola Gonzalez-Quijano (CRH) et Sylvie Steinberg (CRH), précisent ici l’enjeu de cette rencontre.

Ces deux journées d’étude entendent relire l’histoire du long XIXe siècle français au prisme du genre et en résonance avec les questions plus contemporaines étudiées au sein de la Mention Genre Politique et Sexualités (GPS-Sociologie) de l’EHESS. Réunissant des historien.nes, sociologues, littéraires et politistes, elle souhaite initier un travail collectif permettant de dépasser les frontières disciplinaires et de croiser les approches et les outils théoriques.

Il s’agira de mettre en lumière des travaux récents en sciences humaines et sociales qui ont souligné le caractère heuristique du genre et du concept d’intersectionnalité pour comprendre les mutations de la France du XIXe siècle. Assumant le fait que la recherche interroge le passé depuis un présent qui la situe, ces journées s’attacheront aussi à comprendre en quoi les cadres de pensées issus du XIXe siècle, s’ils sont mouvants et peuvent être déconstruits, continuent à nourrir les représentations collectives et les conceptions actuelles du politique. Un retour sur cette période ne peut manquer d’éclairer les stéréotypes à l’œuvre dans les logiques de domination et d’exclusion aujourd’hui. Il s’agira ainsi de proposer des premiers jalons pour opérer, à partir du XIXe siècle, une généalogie des controverses contemporaines qui articulent les questions liées au genre, à la sexualité, au racisme et au post-colonialisme.

Afin de participer à la réflexion collective sur « les sciences sociales au XXIe siècle » menée dans le cadre du quarantenaire de l’EHESS, une table ronde conclusive proposera une discussion mettant en perspective les apports théoriques de ces journées et une réflexion épistémologique sur l’évolution des usages du genre dans les sciences humaines et sociales et notamment en histoire. Le genre sera questionné à la fois comme catégorie d’analyse pour le champ universitaire et comme outil critique mobilisé dans les conflits sociaux et politiques.
Date
du lundi 12 octobre 2015 à 09h30 au mardi 13 octobre 2015 à 17h30
Contact
Liste d’inscription
inscription à : genre19e@gamil.com

programme_genrehistoire19e_v2

http://actualites.ehess.fr/nouvelle6771.html

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website

Podcast séance religieuses – 25 juin – N. Pellegrin, A. Jusseaume

Vous trouverez ci-dessous les podcasts des deux interventions de la dernière séance du séminaire de l’année qui s’est tenue le 25 juin autour des « religieuses »

Deux historiennes nous ont proposé des communications issues de leurs travaux respectifs interrogeant la routine des religieuses.

Nicole Pellegrin (Institut d’Histoire moderne et contemporaine, ENS/CNRS/Université Paris 1) a présenté une intervention intitulée : « Habiller la norme sous l’Ancien régime. Les vêtements de religion féminins dans et hors clôture : créations, (dés)habillages et habitus ».

→ Podcast de l’intervention de Nicole Pellegrin

Anne Jusseaume (Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po) a présenté une intervention intitulée « Temps religieux, temps du soin : le quotidien des sœurs soignantes au XIXe siècle ».

→ Podcast de l’intervention d’Anne Jusseaume

Quelques suggestions de lecture des travaux de nos invitées:

Anne Jusseaume

« Soigner des femmes en couches, un interdit levé pour rechristianiser? Des sœursauprès des parturientes au XIXe siècle ». Chrétiens et sociétés XVIe– XXIe, N°19 «Médecine et religion », 2012. http://chretienssocietes.revues.org/3342

« De la disgrâce à la grâce, la trajectoire des Filles de la Charité « de condition » auXIXe siècle », Hypothèses. Travaux de l’Ecole doctorale d’Histoire, Publications de la Sorbonne, 2014, https://www.cairn.info/revue-hypotheses-2014-1-page-255.htm

Nicole Pellegrin

« Habits du soi, costume de l’autre. Pour une approche critique des sources écrites de l’histoire vestimentaire des identités françaises », in Des habits et nous. Vêtements et identités nationales, éd. Jean-Pierre Lethuillier, Rennes, PUR, 2007, p. 15-23.
« La Nonne en ses costumes de scène. Le cas du théâtre révolutionnaire français », in D. Doumergue et A. Verdier (dir.), Le Costume de scène, objet de recherche, Cirey-les-Mareilles, Lampsaque, 2014, pp. 139-156, ill.
« Quand le voile fait son cinéma. Notes sur les parures blanches de quelques religieuses « hollywoodiennes » préconciliaires » in Claude Coupry et Françoise Cousin (dir.), Lumières du blanc, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, AFET et Sépia, 2014, pp. 129-138 ill.

Exposition: « Femmes au travail en Seine Maritime (1500-1914)»

Femmes au travail en Seine Maritime (1500-1914)

Femmes au travail

Fruit d’une coopération entre les Archives départementales et l’Université de Rouen (GRHis), l’exposition explore la relation des femmes au travail, du Moyen Age à 1914.

La coutume de Normandie laissait aux femmes très peu d’indépendance et pourtant, à Rouen, celles-ci jouaient un rôle important dans les corporations de métier. C’est le « paradoxe rouennais ».

Vies et destins de ces femmes sont racontés dans cette exposition : de la brodeuse passée maîtresse à l’ouvrière contrainte d’abandonner son enfant…l’exposition aborde également la lente conquête de droits pour les femmes.

Un parcours spécifique est destiné aux 10-14 ans, avec dessins et explications adaptées.

Visites guidées gratuites de l’exposition les mardis 14 avril, 12 mai et 16 juin à 14h30.

Sur réservation

Renseignements et réservations

02 35 03 54 95 – archives@cg76.fr

Cette exposition s’accompagne d’un cycle de conférences :

> jeudi 12 mars 2015 à 14 heures 30

Maison de l’Université à Mont-Saint-Aignan

Conférence de Daryl Hafter, Professeure émérite à l’Université de Michigan,

«La femme Normande : un «homme honoraire»

> vendredi 13 mars 2015 à 9 heures 30

Pôle culturel Grammont

Journée d’études organisée par le GRHis de l’Université de Rouen

«Femmes, droits, travail à l’époque moderne et contemporaine(Normandie/Europe)»

http://www.archivesdepartementales76.net/exposition-femmes-au-travail/

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website

Exposition « Femmes en métiers d’hommes », Musée de l’Histoire vivante

Exposition « Femmes en métiers d’hommes »

 Du 17 janvier au 20 décembre 2015

Musée de l’Histoire Vivante, 31 boulevard Théophile Sueur

Comment une société réagit à l’irruption des femmes dans des milieux considérés comme masculins ? Afin d’ouvrir le débat et de tenter de répondre à ces questions, le musée de l’Histoire vivante inaugure, une exposition intitulée « Femmes en métiers d’hommes – de 1890 à nos jours ».

Après le succès de son ouvrage, le travail de Juliette Rennes, maîtresse de conférences à l’Ehess va être présenté sous forme d’exposition pour la première fois. Entre imaginaire et représentations, l’image, et notamment la carte postale de la Belle Epoque, véhicule des sarcasmes et multiplie les mises en scènes ridiculisant les femmes avocates, médecins ou étudiantes. Quand on ne caricature pas, on gomme : on ne montre les ouvrières que statiques, ignorant les gestes de travail.

C’est l’histoire de ces femmes au travail qui est présentée, illustrée par des photographies, des films, des Unes de presse, des manuscrits etc. Histoire visuelle que révèle dans son ouvrage et dans l’exposition Juliette Rennes à partir de cartes postales. Histoire du genre qui montre l’érotisation, l’héroïsation ; ou la moquerie, voire l’hostilité avec laquelle est appréhendée la revendication des femmes à exercer des métiers historiquement masculins.

Enfin, la présentation de photographies contemporaines de Guy Hersant représentant des hommes et des femmes sur leur lieu de travail ne devrait pas manquer de susciter le débat : qu’entend-on par « métier d’homme » aujourd’hui ?

Vernissage de l’exposition « Femmes en métiers d’hommes de 1870 à nos jours » au musée de l’Histoire vivante, le samedi 17 janvier à partir de 17h30.

Participer à l’évènement : https://www.facebook.com/events/374361402737142/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular

 

Informations pratiques :

Du 17 janvier au 31 décembre 2015
Musée de l’histoire vivante, 31 boulevard Théophile Sueur

Horaires :
du mercredi au vendredi de 14h à 17h
le week-end de 14h à 18h
Fermé en août

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_womens_history/toc/jowh.26.4.html

Volume 26, Number 4, Winter 2014

 

Editorial Note:

Making, Shaping, and Resisting Nations in the Twentieth Century: Women in Australia, Occupied Japan, and Postwar United States and Canada

Jean Quataert, Leigh Ann Wheeler

 

Articles:

“A Splendid Object Lesson”: A Transnational Perspective on the Birth of the Australian Nation

Clare Wright

 

Aboriginal Women in Australia’s Traveling Shows, 1930s–1950s: Shadows and Suggestions

Kathryn Hunter

 

Modern Butterfly: American Perceptions of Japanese Women and their Role in International Relations, 1945–1960

Meghan Warner Mettler

 

Beauty, Soft Power, and the Politics of Womanhood During the U.S. Occupation of Japan, 1945–1952

Malia McAndrew

 

Maternalism and the Mayor: Dottie Do-Good’s War on Sin in Postwar Portland

Sarah Koenig

 

Ungodly Grandmother: Marian Sherman and the Social Dimensions of Atheism in Postwar Canada

Tina Block

 

Reviews

Legal History and the Politics of Inclusion

Felice Batlan

 

Women and Fashion

Linda Simon

 

Scouts, Tomboys, and the History of Girls and Girlhood

Amanda H. Littauer

 

Sisters’ History Is Women’s History: The American Context

Margaret Susan Thompson

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society, December 2014

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & Society, December 2014

 

http://gas.sagepub.com/content/28/6.toc

December 2014; 28 (6)

 

Le Sommaire:

Articles

Krista M. Brumley

The Gendered Ideal Worker Narrative: Professional Women’s and Men’s Work Experiences in the New Economy at a Mexican Company

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 799-823, first published on August 19, 2014

 

Rachel Rinaldo

Pious and Critical: Muslim Women Activists and the Question of Agency

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 824-846, first published on September 9, 2014

 

Catherine Bolzendahl

Opportunities and Expectations: The Gendered Organization of Legislative Committees in Germany, Sweden, and the United States

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 847-876, first published on August 1, 2014

 

Éléonore Lépinard

Doing Intersectionality: Repertoires of Feminist Practices in France and Canada

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 877-903, first published on July 25, 2014

 

Kristin Natalier and Belinda Hewitt

Separated Parents Reproducing and Undoing Gender Through Defining Legitimate Uses of Child Support

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 904-925, first published on August 19, 2014

 

Book Reviews

Bethany L. Brown

Book Review: Into the Fire: Disaster and the Remaking of Gender by Shelley Pacholok

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 926-928, first published on March 13, 2014

 

Jennifer L. Martin

Book Review: The Rise of Women: The Growing Gender Gap in Education and What It Means for American Schools by Thomas A. Diprete and Claudia Buchmann

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 928-929, first published on March 18, 2014

 

Kylie Parrotta

Book Review: Sexual Minorities in Sports: Prejudice at Play edited by Melanie L. Sartore-Baldwin

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 930-932, first published on March 21, 2014

 

Marybeth C. Stalp

Book Review: The Marginalized Majority: Media Representation and Lived Experiences of Single Women by Kristie Collins

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 932-934, first published on March 17, 2014

 

Catherine Mobley

Book Review: Our Roots Run Deep as Ironweed: Appalachian Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice by Shannon Elizabeth Bell

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 934-936, first published on April 25, 2014

 

Laura S. Logan

Book Review: Compassionate Confinement: A Year in the Life of Unit C by Laura S. Abrams and Ben Andersen-Nathe

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 936-938, first published on April 25, 2014

 

Laura V. Heston

Book Review: Queering Marriage: Challenging Family Formation in the United States by Katrina Kimport

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 938-940, first published on April 22, 2014

 

Emily S. Mann

Book Review: Amigas y Amantes: Sexually Nonconforming Latinas Negotiate Family by Katie L. Acosta

Gender & Society December 2014 28: 940-942, first published on June 23, 2014

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

La prosopographie au féminin, prochaine séance du séminaire « La prosopographie, objets et méthodes » (ENS de Lyon)

La seconde séance du séminaire « La prosopographie, objets et méthodes » sera consacrée à la question de la prosopographie au féminin. Elle aura lieu le vendredi 28 novembre, de 14h à 17h, à l’ENS de Lyon, Parvis René Descartes, en salle F 005.
Ce séminaire est ouvert à toutes et tous. N’hésitez pas à diffuser l’information à toute personne que vous penseriez intéressée.
28 novembre 2014 (Ens de Lyon) : Les femmes
Sylvie Duval (École française de Rome), « Les moniales entre réforme religieuse et transformations sociales (1385-1461) »

Caroline Giron-Panel (Bibliothèque nationale de France), « Prosopographie des musiciennes des Ospedali de Venise (XVIIe-XVIIIe s.) »

Vincent Vilmain (GSRL UMR 8582 CNRS/EPHE), « les femmes de la faculté de médecine de Paris (1871-1914) »

Le programme complet est disponible à l’adresse suivante: http://prosopographie.hypotheses.org/116

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website

La bibliographie de l’été, Hommes – Femmes : les différences au prisme des sciences humaines et sociales

Le département Philosophie, histoire sciences de l’homme de la BNF vient de réaliser une bibliographie ayant pour thème : Hommes – Femmes : les différences au prisme des sciences humaines et sociales. Celle-ci est accompagnée d’une présentation d’ouvrages dans la salle J de la bibliothèque d’études de la BNF jusqu’au 30 septembre.

http://www.bnf.fr/documents/biblio_hommes_femmes.pdf

L’occasion de redécouvrir également leur bibliographie Genre et éducation.

http://www.bnf.fr/documents/biblio_genre.pdf

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website

Une question à : Clara Chevalier, doctorante en histoire à l’EHESS

Comment s’articulent genre et classes populaires dans votre recherche sur la répression des mouvements populaires parisiens au XVIIIe siècle ?

 

Dans la mesure où je travaille sur ces mouvements populaires à partir d’archives de police et de justice, c’est-à-dire des documents qui ont servi à les réprimer, je suis moins amenée à travailler sur les pratiques sociales populaires elles-mêmes que sur le point de vue dominant sur le peuple, tel qu’il s’exprime dans ces sources. Je vais alors moins traiter des classes populaires au sens sociologique que de la catégorie « peuple » sous l’Ancien Régime, construite selon un point de vue qui a le pouvoir de nommer, de classer le social. Dans les dictionnaires de l’époque, par exemple, le peuple est distingué du « menu peuple » ou « petit peuple », qui est défini en négatif, par opposition aux élites. Ce « peuple » est caractérisé par son nombre et son comportement, jugé menaçant, en particulier en contexte urbain. Cette appréhension du peuple est étroitement liée à celle de l’émeute populaire : en quelque sorte, l’émeute précède le peuple – elle « postule le peuple »[1]. Les mouvements populaires sont craints, attendus, et vus comme déterminés, au sens où le peuple est perçu comme potentiellement émeutier par nature, selon le discours essentialisant dont il est l’objet, analysé par l’historienne Déborah Cohen[2]. Ainsi envisagées, ses actions collectives sont, pour le dire en des termes actuels, rejetées hors du politique, dans un régime monarchique où elles sont perçues comme infondées et illégitimes.

Ce regard posé sur le peuple, par la police et la justice en ce qui concerne mon corpus d’archives, est traversé et structuré par les rapports sociaux de sexe, ce qui se traduit notamment par un traitement répressif différent réservé aux hommes et aux femmes du peuple. Ainsi, les émeutières sont moins menacées d’arrestation que les émeutiers car la police porte d’abord son attention sur les hommes pauvres. Cette appréhension sexuée du peuple dans le cadre du processus répressif est indissociable d’une conception a priori de l’émeute[3], qui, pour être redoutée, est pensée à l’aune de certitudes et d’une grille de lecture policière selon laquelle ce sont ces hommes qui incarnent l’émeute. Analyser les rapports de pouvoir qui se jouent à travers les modalités de la répression avec le genre comme catégorie d’analyse amène à constater qu’à la négation du peuple comme acteur politique s’imbrique un second rapport de pouvoir, qui concerne les femmes du peuple et a pour effet d’invisibiliser leur présence et leur action dans l’émeute, dont ces documents judiciaires ne rendent pas compte.

En termes d’écriture de l’histoire, une dynamique similaire s’est rejouée dans l’historiographie, en particulier dans certains ouvrages d’histoire consacrés aux émeutes vivrières d’Ancien Régime, c’est-à-dire aux mouvements populaires qui répondent à une augmentation du prix du pain, question cruciale dans ce système économique. Des classifications des mouvements populaires ont ainsi été établies, notamment à l’aune de leurs motifs – anti-fiscaux, religieux, frumentaires… A cette catégorisation répond une hiérarchisation, en fonction de ce que ces historiens considèrent comme relevant ou non du « politique ». Les émeutes de subsistances se trouvent alors réduites à des émeutes de la faim[4], dépourvues d’organisation, irrationnelles, en bref qualifiées de « spontanées », et ce d’autant plus que ces révoltes d’Ancien Régime sont évaluées à l’aune de la Révolution française. Ici encore le genre joue un rôle, dans la mesure où ces émeutes vivrières sont d’autant moins vues comme politiques qu’elles sont assimilées, selon une approche essentialiste, à une forme d’action féminine. Les fonctions attribuées au féminin et au masculin, loin d’être envisagées comme des constructions sociales, reposeraient alors sur la différence biologique des sexes, qui suffirait ainsi à expliquer la participation des femmes aux émeutes, en vertu de leur rôle nourricier[5]. Le féminin étant assimilé à l’espace domestique, l’action des femmes, surtout si elle est liée au travail reproductif, est naturalisée : elle ne peut donc être véritablement politique[6]. Or, l’histoire des femmes a montré que cette analogie entre femmes du peuple et sphère privée ne correspond pas aux pratiques sociales populaires du XVIIIe siècle.

Cette convergence entre le point de vue dominant du XVIIIe siècle sur les mouvements populaires et celui d’historiens du XXe siècle a assuré une certaine permanence de cette conception de l’action collective du peuple et des femmes du peuple. Il importe donc de réinterroger du point de vue du genre tant les archives que l’historiographie, afin d’ouvrir la possibilité d’une lecture critique de l’histoire de ces mouvements populaires.


[1]    Christian Jouhaud, « Révoltes et contestations d’Ancien Régime », in André Burguière, Jacques Revel (dir.), Histoire de la France, vol. 3, Les conflits, Paris, Seuil, 1990, p. 70.

[2]    Déborah Cohen, La nature du peuple. Les formes de l’imaginaire social (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles), Seyssel, Champ Vallon, 2010.

[3]    Arlette Farge, Jacques Revel, Logiques de la foule. L’affaire des enlèvements d’enfants. Paris, 1750, Paris, Hachette, 1988.

[4]    Une idée combattue par Edward P. Thompson : E. P. Thompson, « The Moral Economy of the English Crowd in the Eighteenth Century », Past and Present, février 1971, n° 50, p. 76-136.

[5]    Pour un exemple récent : Jean Nicolas, La rébellion française. Mouvements populaires et conscience sociale, 1661-1789, Paris, Seuil, 2002.

[6]    Joan W. Scott, « Women in The Making of the English Working Class », in Gender and the Politics of History, New York, Columbia University Press, 1999 (1988), p. 68-90. Traduction française : « Les femmes dans La Formation de la classe ouvrière anglaise », in De l’utilité du genre, Paris, Fayard, 2012, p. 55-88.

Dernier numéro de la revue Clio, Les lois genrées de la guerre

couv_Clio_39

À l’occasion de la parution du n°39 de CLIO, Femmes, Genre, Histoire, la revue porte son regard sur les femmes et les conflits. Depuis la fin du XXe siècle, l’étude de cette thématique a été renouvelée par l’approche anthropologique du fait guerrier, par une attention à l’intime et par la focale sur les sorties de guerre. La dénonciation de la violence sexuelle et la protection des populations civiles ont été de plus en plus prises en compte au niveau international. Ainsi, depuis la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les violences faites aux femmes et la mixité croissante de la sphère militaire ont constitué un marqueur fluctuant de ce que l’on nomme « les lois de la guerre ».

Sommaire du dossier coordonné par Fabrice Virgili:

• Philippe Clancier, « Hommes guerriers et femmes invisibles, le choix des scribes dans le Proche-Orient ancien »
• Sophie Cassagnes-Brouquet, « Au service de la guerre juste. Mathilde de Toscane (XIe-XIIe siècle) »
• Mariana Muravyeva, « “Ni pillage ni viol sans ordre préalable”. Codifier la guerre dans l’Europe moderne »
• Régis Schlagdenhauffen, « Désirs condamnés : punir les « homosexuels » en Alsace annexée (1940-1945) »
• Alain Blum & Amandine Regamey, « Le héros et la martyre ou le viol effacé (Lituanie 1944-2000) »
• Christine Lévy, « Le Tribunal international des femmes de Tokyo en 2000 : une réponse féministe au révisionnisme ? »

Plus d’infos sur http://clio.revues.org/

 

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website

Lecture: Les Affranchies: franc-comtoises sans frontières

Les Affranchies : Franc-Comtoises sans frontière, sous la direction de Nella Arambasin, Presses Universitaires de Franche-Comté, 2014

À la recherche d’ »affranchies », cet ouvrage issu d’un colloque transdisciplinaire tenu à Besançon en juin 2011 et coordonné par Nella Arambasin se donne pour objectif les propos de Geneviève Fraisse à savoir « comprendre le jeu du chat et de la souris entre domination masculine et subversion féministe » par des études in situ où l’on retrouve notamment des nonnes rebelles, la coiffeuse d’Hillary Clinton ou encore les ouvrières de Lip.

Les questions d’espace, de situation et de position constituent la problématique centrale des différentes communications qui s’efforcent d’interroger l’affranchissement, la marge de manœuvre et plus généralement la capacité d’agir de femmes in situ, en interrogeant « leur implication locale, la manière dont les événements vécus sont liés aux modalités spatiales de leur déroulement/déplacement » soit leur « pratique du lieu ».

La notion de « lisière » mobilisée de façon convaincante par Nella Arambasin en introduction — dont la boîte à outils est plus que stimulante — constitue ainsi la déclinaison au spatial de cette puissance d’agir de femmes, elle renvoie à cette dialectique du « placement/déplacement » qui parcourt ce recueil, et à la volonté d’étudier l’affranchissement de ces femmes par les limites qu’elles négocient et les seuils qu’elles franchissent. « Déconstruire l’autorité : tours et détours », « Construire du lien en un lieu : l’ailleurs autrement », « Circuler entre espaces publics et privés : témoignages et sources », les titres des trois grandes parties de l’ouvrage soulignent bien le tournant spatial emprunté par ces différentes études de cas pour penser « la place » des femmes dans l’histoire.

 

Présentation de l’ouvrage en ligne.

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website