Archives du mot-clé feminism

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

https://muse.jhu.edu/

 

Volume 28, Issue 3, Fall 2016


Editorial Note

“Changing Feminist Paradigms and Cultural Encounters: Women’s Experiences in Ottoman and Post-Ottoman History in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries”

Elisa Camiscioli, Jean H. Quataert, Benita Roth

 

Articles

Introduction

Gülhan Balsoy

 

“They can breathe freely now”: The International Council of Women and Ottoman Muslim Women (1893–1920s)

Nicole A.N.M. van Os

 

National and Transnational Dynamics of Women’s Activism in Turkey in the 1950s and 1960s: The Story of the ICW Branch in Ankara

Umut Azak, Henk de Smaele

 

Transcultural Encounters: Discourses on Women’s Rights and Feminist Interventions in the Ottoman Empire, Greece, and Turkey from the Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Interwar Period

Efi Kanner

 

Women’s Migration for Prostitution in the interwar Middle East and North Africa

Liat Kozma

 

Toxic Murder, Female Poisoners, and the Question of Agency at the Late Ottoman Law Courts, 1840–1908

Ebru Aykut

 

The Uncertainties of Freedom: The Second Constitutional Era and the End of Slavery in the Late Ottoman Empire

Ceyda Karamursel

 

Maternal Colonialism and Turkish Woman’s Burden in Dersim: Educating the “Mountain Flowers” of Dersim

Zeynep Turkyilmaz

Save

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History, Summer 2014

Dernier numéro de la revue: Journal of Women’s History

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_womens_history/toc/jowh.26.2.html

Volume 26, Number 2, Summer 2014

 

Feminists in the Global West: Advances, Reversals, and Persistence

Jean Quataert, Leigh Ann Wheeler

 

Wollstonecraft as an International Feminist Meme

Eileen Hunt Botting, Christine Carey Wilkerson, Elizabeth N. Kozlow

 

Feminism and Fatherhood in Western Europe, 1900–1950s

Ann Taylor Allen

 

Transnational Pan-American Feminism: The Friendship of Bertha Lutz and Mary Wilhelmine Williams, 1926–1944

Katherine M. Marino

 

“A Rainbow of Women”: Diversity and Unity at the 1977 U.S. International Women’s Year Conference

Doreen J. Mattingly, Jessica L. Nare

 

“The Hand that Rocks the Cradle Should Rock the U. of C.”: The Faculty Wife and the Feminist Era

Katherine Turk

 

Getting to the Heart of Science: Rosalie Bertell’s Eco-Feminist Approach to Science and Anti-Nuclear Activism

Lisa Rumiel

 

Book Reviews

Women, Revolution, and the Making of a New Nation

Kim Cary Warren

 

Goodnight Ladies

Ann M. Little

 

Women and Welfare in the United States

Miriam Cohen

 

Breaching the Wall: Beyond the Convent in Catholic Reformation Europe

Lynn Wood Mollenauer

 

“Tapestries of Contacts”: Transnationalizing Women’s History

Francisca de Haan

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Dernier numéro du Journal of Women’s History: “Human Rights, Global Conferences, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms”

Sortie du dernier numéro du Journal of Women’s History: “Human Rights, Global Conferences, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms”

Journal of Women's History Cover

Un extrait de l’introduction de  Jean H. Quataert et Benita Roth:

From: Journal of Women’s History
Volume 24, Number 4, Winter 2012
pp. 11-23 | 10.1353/jowh.2012.0038

 

“This note introduces our special issue on « Human Rights, Global Conferences, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms. » In it we try to capture part of the contentious histories of feminist activism unfolding in the period after World War II. We focus specifically on the meanings for feminist thought and action worldwide of the UN sponsored world conferences on women and related international gatherings. Prodded by international and national women’s non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and facilitated through the UN’s Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), the United Nations General Assembly declared 1975 « International Women’s Year » (IWY) and named 1975-1985 as the « Decade for Women. » The UN sponsored three large international conferences beginning with Mexico City (1975), followed by Copenhagen (1980), and Nairobi (1985); these gatherings generated so much momentum that a Fourth Women’s World Conference was held in Beijing in 1995. Other UN conferences, including the World Conference Against Racism (WCAR) in Durban, South Africa in September 2001, also featured in this issue, allowed feminist antiracist activists around the globe to come together to discuss understandings of the intersections of gender and racial oppression.

These conferences took place against the backdrop of a number of formative geopolitical developments: Cold War tensions and their subsequent easing after 1989; decolonization struggles and emerging nations’ insistent drive for equitable economic development amid the continuing inequalities of the global economic and political order; the rise of neo-liberal economic agendas; women’s increased participation globally in the formal labor sector; transnational organizing for lesbian and gay rights; and a concomitant, significant rise by the mid-1990s of conservative religious and fundamentalist groups around the world. These geopolitical and cultural factors sometimes sustained and sometimes constrained the ability of diverse feminist and women’s activists to form alliances, set new international and national agendas, and see to their implementation on the ground.

Until very recently, much of what has appeared about the UN conferences in journal literature has been in the form of reports on participants’ experiences nearly exclusively in women’s studies journals. Since 1996, it has mainly been feminist sociologists and political scientists charting the effects of the UN conferences on feminist and women’s organizing around the globe. There also is a vibrant literature assessing the impact of women’s world conferences on feminist contributions to development discourses, particularly those efforts challenging the neo-liberal assumptions that drive the giving of mainstream development aid. These debates stress ongoing unequal macro-economic contexts.

The topic of the UN meetings, with a few exceptions, has been left largely unexamined in women’s history despite its undeniable importance for shaping the vibrant new patterns of transnational advocacy networks that emerged during the Decade. The same time frame saw a huge growth of feminist NGOs worldwide; the invention of innovative gatherings like the World Social Forums, which feature impressive participation by feminist activists; and the creation of UN People’s Forums, which gave voice and visibility to NGOs as well as to local leaders and activists generally marginal to governmental authority and power. Strikingly, however, the Journal of Women’s History paid scant scholarly attention to these conferences. One short report by Peggy Simpson, « Beijing in Perspective, » appeared in the Spring 1996 issue; Simpson was an acclaimed Associated Press journalist whose personal experiences are part of the larger narrative presented here. In 1997, the JWH published Wang Zheng’s article « Maoism, Feminism, and the UN Conference on Women: Women’s Studies Research in Contemporary China. » The relative neglect by historians of the more recent interface of global and local feminist organizing lies, perhaps, in the challenges for historical research of engaging contemporary themes and issues. The growing interest among women’s historians in human rights histories and comparative studies in women’s movements thus reflects a major conceptual shift, which promises a turn to transnational methodologies, interregional connections, and global historical perspectives. As we hope to show through the articles in this issue, the entry provided…”

 

The articles:

Guest Editorial Note: Human Rights, Global Conferences, and the Making of Postwar Transnational Feminisms

Jean H. Quataert, Benita Roth

 

Empires of Information: Media Strategies for the 1975 International Women’s Year

Jocelyn Olcott

 

Rethinking State Socialist Mass Women’s Organizations: The Committee of the Bulgarian Women’s Movement and the United Nations Decade for Women, 1975-1985

Kristen Ghodsee

 

Negotiating Religious and Women’s Identities: Catholic Women at the UN World Conferences, 1975-1995

Agnès Desmazières

 

Transnational Feminism and Contextualized Intersectionality at the 2001 World Conference Against Racism

Sylvanna M. Falcón

 

Global Gender Policy in the 1990s: Incorporating the « Vital Voices » of Women

Karen Garner

 

Indian Women Activists and Transnational Feminism over the Twentieth Century

Nandini Deo

 

UN Activist Forum

Historians Meet Activists at the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, June 2011

Kathryn Kish Sklar, Thomas Dublin

 

Unfinished Agenda

Mildred Emory Persinger

 

Making History Word by Word

Arvonne S. Fraser

 

Passion: Driving the Feminist Movement Forward

Devaki Jain

 

Sustaining Advocacy for Women’s Empowerment for Four Decades

Rounaq Jahan

 

Opening Doors for Feminism: UN World Conferences on Women

Charlotte Bunch

 

Book Reviews

« Stay Involved »: Transnational Feminist Advocacy and Women’s Human Rights

Helen Laville

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Le Féminisme change-t-il nos vies ?

Gardey Delphine (dir.), Le féminisme change-t-il nos vies ?, Paris, Textuel, 2011

« Plus qu’un bilan, il s’agit de proposer une lecture vivante des prises de position féministes contemporaines et des questions dont elles s’emparent. Déclinée au présent, notre réflexion vise ce qui a eu lieu, ce qui est en cours et ce qui s’ouvre » (p. 10), ainsi s’ouvre cette petite encyclopédie critique, véritable boîte à outils pour penser avec l’épistémologie féministe.

L’ouvrage collectif dirigé par Delphine Gardey, historienne et sociologue, entreprend ainsi de dresser une synthèse vive des théories féministes et de leurs questionnements pour penser les rapports historiques, politiques et sociaux entre les sexes. Politique, travail, sexualité, individualisme, (post)colonialisme constituent autant de domaines investis et transformés par le féminisme.

La conclusion de l’ouvrage rappelle que pour penser le féminisme, race, genre, classe et sexualité doivent être articulés. « En contexte (post)féministe, la perte du sujet unifié (de l’action individuelle et collective) et de l’idéal de totalité est perçue comme un bienfait et le ressort pour de nouvelles connexions, de nouvelles opportunités » (p. 121). L’intersectionnalité permet alors de penser à partir de la multiplicité des expériences des femmes pour valoriser un pluralisme nécessaire à l’espace de réflexion du féminisme, mais également à son cadre d’action critique et politique.

Clyde Plumauzille

Sommaire

Le féminisme change-t-il nos vies ?
Delphine Gardey (historienne et sociologue)

Le féminisme a-t-il transformé la politique ? 
Isabelle Giraud (politiste)

Le féminisme a-t-il déplacé les frontières du travail ?
Rachel Vuagniaux (sociologue)

Le féminisme a-t-il redéfini les sexualités ?
Lorena Parini (politiste)

Un féminisme « décolonial » est-il possible ?
Lulia Hasdeu (anthropologue)

Le féminisme est-il soluble dans l’individu ? 
Laurence Bachmann (sociologue)

Le féminisme émancipera-t-il les hommes ? 
Christian Schiess (sociologue)

Définir les vies possibles, penser le monde commun 
Delphine Gardey

 

Compte-rendus en ligne:

http://lectures.revues.org/7791

http://gss.revues.org/index1995.html

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website

The Question of Gender: Joan W. Scott’s Critical Feminism

Butler, Judith and Elizabeth Weed, eds. The Question of Gender: Joan W. Scott’s Critical Feminism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2011.

 

Twenty-five years after Joan Scott published her groundbreaking article, “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis,” scholars from multiple disciplines reflect on the ways in which Scott’s bold questions have informed their work. The essays in this volume cut across vectors of race, class, sexuality, religion, colonialism, and citizenship while treading the globe from India to France to ground diverse case studies. By contextualizing Scott’s questions within their own research, thirteen scholars from history, literature, and philosophy illustrate the dynamic uses of gender. They conclude that gender’s analytical uses are as myriad and complex as the hierarchies of power that it intersects. This thought-provoking volume confirms the continuous critical and creative potential of gender as a “question” of analysis.

Katie Jarvis

Introduction, Judith Butler and Elizabeth Weed

Part I: Reading Joan Wallach Scott

1. Speaking Up, Talking Back: Joan Scott’s Critical Feminism | Judith Butler

Part II: The Case of History

2. Language, Experience, and Identity: Joan W. Scott and the Theoretical Challenge to Historical Studies | Miguel A. Cabrera

3. Out of Their Orbit: Celebrities and Eccentrics in Nineteenth-Century France | Mary Louise Roberts

4. Historically Speaking: Gender and Citizenship in Colonial India | Mrinalini Sinha

5. Gender and the Figure of the ‘Moderate Muslim’: Feminism in the Twenty-first Century | Elora Shehabuddin

6. A Double-Edged Sword: Sexual Democracy, Gender Norms, and Racialized Rhetoric  | Éric Fassin

Part III: Seeing the Question

7. Seeing beyond the Norm: Interpreting Gender in the Visual Arts | Mary D. Sheriff

8. Unlikely Couplings: The Gendering of Print Technology in the French Fin-de-Siècle | Janis Bergman-Carton

9. Screening the Avant-Garde Face | Mary Ann Doane

Part IV: Body and Sexuality in Question

10. The Sexual Schema: Transposition and Transgenderism in Phenomenology of Perception | Gayle Salamon

11. Foucault and Feminism’s Prodigal Children | Lynne Huffer

12. From the ‘Useful’ to the ‘Impossible’ in Joan W. Scott | Elizabeth Weed

Thinking in Time: An Epilogue on Ethics and Politics | Wendy Brown

 

 

 

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Une question à : Joan Scott sur la notion d’expérience

 

Groupe Genre et Classes populaires: Vous expliquez dans votre ouvrage comment l’expérience, en préexistant, conduit à une naturalisation, que cette dernière n’est que discours, vous ajoutez: « l’expérience vécue des femmes est vue comme le facteur qui nourrit directement la résistance à l’oppression, c’est à dire le féminisme. Précisément, le politique devient possible parce qu’il repose sur ou procède d’une expérience des femmes qui lui préexiste. » Comment faire émerger une capacité d’agir sans cela?

Gender and the Popular Classes Group: You explain in your work how experience, by preexisting, leads to a sort of naturalization. This naturalization is only a discourse. You add: “the lived experience of women is seen as leading directly to resistance to oppression, that is, to feminism. Indeed, the possibility of politics is said to rest on, to follow from, a preexisting women’s experience.” How can we act collectively without this?

Joan Scott: In my essay on experience, I’m talking to historians and the determining power they give to the notion of « experience. »  This is a different question from the one you ask about « la capacité d’agir. »  It is, indeed, the notion of a shared experience that creates the possibility for collective action in the name of some group interest, what Denise Riley refers to as the « massification » of women around questions of suffrage, for example.  The operations of politics though are different from the analytic work of the historian.  There, to simply take experience as an explanation, without asking how it works to create collective identity, prefers description to analysis.  I want to know: what aspects of women’s lives are selected to count as ‘experience’, what aspects are left out?  By what processes (political, rhetorical, psychological) are individuals welded into a group that understands it has something in common?  How and in what contexts does, for example motherhood, become the defining trait around which women identify, instead of, say, sexuality, or legal rights or similarity to men?  Problematizing the concept of « experience » for analytic purposes of writing history in no way denies the importance of claiming experience in the political realm.

Joan Scott : Dans mon essai sur l’expérience, je dialogue avec les historiens et je questionne le pouvoir déterminant qu’ils donnent à la notion d’ « expérience ». C’est une question différente de celle que vous posez à propos de « la capacité d’agir ».  C’est, effectivement, la notion d’une expérience partagée qui crée la possibilité d’une action collective au nom d’un groupe d’intérêt, ce dont parle Denise Riley avec la « massification » des femmes à propos des questions de suffrage par exemple. Cependant, les opérations du politique sont différentes du travail analytique de l’historien. Car, prendre simplement l’expérience comme une explication, sans se demander comment cette notion travaille à créer une identité collective, c’est préférer la description à l’analyse.  Je veux savoir : quels aspects de la vie des femmes sont sélectionnés pour compter comme « expérience », et quels sont exclus ? Par quels procédés (politiques, rhétoriques, psychologiques) les individus sont-ils soudés en un groupe qui se comprend comme ayant quelque chose en commun ? Comment et dans quel contexte la maternité, par exemple, devient l’axe de définition autour duquel chaque femme s’identifie au lieu de, disons, la sexualité, ou les droits légaux, ou la similarité avec les hommes ? Problématiser le concept d’ « expérience » dans une visée analytique d’écriture de l’histoire ne nie aucunement l’importance de revendiquer l’expérience dans le domaine politique.

Une recension sur l’ouvrage: http://clio.revues.org/9948?&id=9948

 

 

Séance du vendredi 3 février — « L’écriture et la consommation: des modes d’action féminins à la Belle Epoque »

Bonne année à tous. La quatrième séance du séminaire Genre et Classes Populaires aura lieu vendredi 3 février de 16h à 18h à l’Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne en salle Picard (3e étage escalier C).

Sandrine Roll (docteure en Histoire, professeure d’Histoire-Géographie) traitera du sujet suivant:  “L’écriture et la consommation: des modes d’action féminins à la Belle Epoque.”

La bibliographie Consommation, genre et classes populaires est en ligne, n’hésitez pas à la consulter!

Happy new year to everyone. The fourth session of the seminar Genre et Classes Populaires will take place Friday, February 3 from 16h to 18h at the Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne in the Picard room (3rd floor, stairway C).

Sandrine Roll (PhD in History, Professor of History-Geography) will present the following subject: “Writing and consumption: the modes of feminine action during the Belle Époque.”

Clyde Plumauzille

Docteure en histoire de l’Université Paris 1 et allocataire postdoctorante de l'Institut Emilie du Châtelet, mes recherches portent sur les économies intimes des classes populaires féminines à l'époque moderne et contemporaine.

More Posts - Website