Archives du mot-clé Call for Papers

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Call for Papers

Difficult Conversations: Thinking and Talking about Women,
Genders, and Sexualities Inside and Outside the Academy
at Hofstra University, Hempstead NY
June 1-4, 2017

The deadline for submission of proposals for individual papers, panels, and other sessions is January 15, 2016.  All proposals must be submitted electronically via the Berkshire Conference website. (http://2017berkshireconference.hofstra.edu/call-for-papers/#instructions). This site will be available for submissions from August 1, 2015 to January 15, 2016. As part of the submission process, you will be asked to select the Theme Track, or subject area, in which you would like your proposal considered. Your proposal will then be forwarded to the appropriate Track Chair.

Themed Tracks

From those listed below, please identify the subject area in which you wish to have your proposal considered. Note: Several divisions include suggested themes for exploration. These suggestions do not preclude proposals on other topics.  Questions about tracks should be directed to track co-chairs.

  1. Gender and the State: Majorities and Minorities

The state is present in gendered debates on the rights and obligations of citizenship, the provision of social welfare, governance and control, hierarchy and fealty, discrimination and marginalization. State power and also state violence are expressed differentially according to gender, with reference to legal status, reproductive rights, marriage, death, and an individual’s inclusion in the polity. Proposals might explore some of the following questions: How are gendered experiences and identities shaped by the state, and how do the demands of sexual, racial, ethnic, religious, and indigenous minorities shape state practices and institutions? How does power circulate between majorities and minorities, and how is difference, subordination, and subjecthood produced by the state, and also challenged by non-dominant communities? Specific examples might also refer to legal equality and legal status; struggles for suffrage; reproductive, human, and migrant rights; and the regulation of gendered forms of labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Social Justice, Migration and the City

Cities – as spatial forms, economic entities, and human habitats – are dynamic hubs where identity, social relations, power, inequality, and social change are visible and contested in the natural, built, and human environment, in memories and artifacts of the past, and the present. Movements of people searching for better lives and for greater opportunities, fleeing persecution and violence, or just escaping the confines of their previous lives, often end up in cities. Whether segregated or intermingled, people from different regions and different parts of the world negotiate space and identity, fight for justice and create change. We invite proposals from historians and interdisciplinary scholars working on different geographical areas, or transnationally, that explore some aspect of the historical role that migrants, migration and urban space have played in advancing both inequality and freedom, in incubating struggles for social justice and change.

Proposals in this track are encouraged to consider the following questions: how migration and mobility have impacted economic, social, cultural and political relations and formations; how the city as a spatial form influences perceptions about poverty and wealth, citizenship, social control and the nation of freedom; how global forces, markets and privatization create and/or shape urban spaces and people’s lives; how inequalities manifest in urban spaces and through institutions such as housing, employment, and education; how cities shape notions of community and belonging, identity, access and exclusion; and how urban (suburban and ex-urban) environments structure organizing, grassroots activism and social justice agendas

Track Chairs:

  1. Globalized Labor

Examining women’s labor from a global perspective offers many possibilities to consider historical specificity, women’s migration, political involvement, and transnational social movements, as well as the multiple ways in which women’s labor shapes and is shaped by broader political and economic processes. It also examines how women’s labor has defined global circuits, labor demands, and transnational labor, especially in regards to intimate labor, care-giving, outsourcing life (surrogacy), lack of documentation, and informal economies.  By the same token, we are interested in papers that look at how women have organized to challenge women’s disenfranchisement and oppression within globalized systems of labor and production.

We invite proposals from historians of different geographical areas, transnational scholars, as well as activists that address the following areas: women and transatlantic/transpacific migration; trafficking and forced labor; neoliberalism and labor migration; subcontracted labor; guest workers; the informal sector; women entrepreneurs; the gender pay gap; women’s labor and climate change; segregated labor markets; international labor organizing; women’s labor and social reproduction; transnational families and women’s work; surrogate motherhood and transnational adoption; women’s labor and free trade policy; the wages for housework movement; working class/labor movements; transnational social movements; the International Labour Organization (ILO) and women’s labor; labor legislation/protective legislation and women workers.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

  4. Slavery and Other Forms of Unfree Labor

We invite historians, activists, and others who are interested in examining how systems of unfree labor shaped lived experiences in “free” and “unfree” societies from ancient times to the twenty-first century. Slavery configured the geographic landscape of all who came into contact with it and connected societies economically, especially as global capitalism developed rapidly.  As a result of slavery’s commodification, systems of inequality were established that still linger.  We hope that the panel presentations offered will provide deep analyses of slavery, push forward new methodological approaches, broaden historiographical borders that have surrounded the subject, and advance new questions about the historical legacies of unfree labor.  We are especially interested in receiving proposals that emphasize the gendered dimensions of slavery and unfree labor in comparative frameworks temporally and spatially, from the ancient world to the 21st century. Papers might include analyses of slave systems that connected societies across the Atlantic, Pacific or Indian oceans, trans-Saharan slavery, convict labor, sexual (including marriage) and debt slavery, or other institutions of bonded labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Capitalism

With the recent, renewed interest in the history of capitalism, we seek to open up a conversation that deepens our understanding of capitalism and its diverse role in the transformation of economies and societies across the globe.  We are particularly interested in proposals that consider how the study of women and gender can help us better understand global capitalism as an internally differentiated and interconnected, shared structure.  Proposals that join an innovative use of both quantitative and qualitative methods and evidence will be given special consideration, as will those that incorporate how historians, activists, artists, economists and others have engaged with the histories of capitalism.  We invite submissions on topics as diverse as corporate capitalism, the service economy, markets and consumption, business, the environment and development, social networks, globalization and antiglobalization, and big data.

Track chairs:

  1. Sexualities, Gender Identities and Expressions

We call for proposals that consider the question of how sex, sexualities and gender are managed and maintained across boundaries of race, class, and culture  (among others). New paths of contestation engaging the fluidity of genders and sexualities are called for in the current state of emergency surrounding issues of anti-Black racism and police brutality that have generated public protest in the United States.  Similarly, popular and state uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa (among others), have destabilized conventional hierarchies. How might these conflicts generate new models of activism, scholarship, and praxis along axes of gender identity, expression, and sexualities?  How do emergent gender identities and sexual expressions produce both antagonisms and possibilities? Papers that concern historically situated race and racism and local and transnational state violence are particularly relevant.  The Sexualities and Gender Identities and Expressions track will also consider but not be limited to: queer pedagogies; reproductive technologies and sexualities; relations among Feminist Studies/LGBTQ Studies/ Queer Studies; police states and violence; intimate partner violence; social protest; pleasure and sexual practices; trans*/national movements and movement building; political coalitions; dangerous intimacies.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

7. Women, Gender and Science

The Program Committee welcomes proposals for panels, papers, round-table discussions, or other presentations on all aspects of the history of women, gender(s), and science (including medicine and technology). We are particularly interested in creating a program that includes a range of geographic areas, historical periods, and methodologies. We welcome proposals that are interdisciplinary and intersectional, and that represent a diverse set of voices within academia and beyond including, but not limited to, those that engage visual and performing arts, science fiction, civic science, do-it-yourself experiments, computing and the Maker Movement. We especially encourage panel proposals that bring together scholars, artists, and/or practitioners around a common theme.

Track Chairs:

  1. Pedagogy and Work Culture, K-12

The Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities brings together thousands of historians, activists, educators, and artists to share their research and activism. The 2017 conference especially wants to involve teachers and teacher educators in a lively discussion of teachers’ work as well as curriculum, pedagogy, and the history of education informed by feminist, queer, Marxist, and race-based theory. We plan to partner teachers and teacher educators with academics, school activists, museum educators, librarians, and artists to explore gender and sexuality in school curricula and the life of schools and those who work there. A range of creative presentation formats—including performance-based, digital, and open forum—are encouraged.  Possible topics include:  How genders and sexuality are taught (or not taught) in the curriculum in the era of high stakes testing; Engaging social issues in K-12 curriculum (e.g., peace, suffrage, temperance, anti-lynching) that illuminate and enrich the understanding of a particular era or movement;  The gendered nature of the attack on public education, the history of women in the schools, and teacher union history; Gender and the work of teachers, including oral histories of closeted and “out” queer educators.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and War

War, as a time of dramatic rupture and change, can bring terrible suffering but also, potentially, opportunity. Wars serve to construct, fracture and challenge gender identities and gendered hierarchies. Gender, moreover, has been a mobilizing theme for both anti-war and militaristic movements. We invite innovative contributions that address topics such as the gendered dimensions of both home fronts and battle fronts; the intersections of gender, ethnicity and religious identification in war contexts; the ways that different genders and sexualities are negotiated within wartime regimes; the intersections of war, gender, science and technology; the gendered dimensions of war memory, memorialization and mourning; the gendering of wartime discourse and propaganda; and media, literary and visual representations of gender, war and conflict. Submissions may deal with any geographical area(s) and any historical era, from ancient to modern.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

10. Refugees, Asylum and Gender

Gender and sexuality have shaped the flow of people fleeing war persecution, man-made and natural catastrophes, playing a strong role not only in who flees, but also in what they experience. Additionally, as a form of forced migration, refugee migration invites juxtaposition with detention and deportation, international adoption, and human trafficking.  Thus we invite path breaking contributions that address the experiences of such coerced migrants in various  times and places, focusing on such topics as sustaining everyday life in refugee camps and in resettlement, gendered persecution (such as intimate partner violence, forced marriage, or rape) in asylum cases, gendered treatment of refugees, gendered effects of refugee and asylum policies, the gendered discourse of refugees and asylum, gendered forms of resilience and creativity,  the intersection of gender/race/culture/ability and sexuality and historic and ongoing inequity as a factor in forced migration. We especially welcome proposals that cross boundaries, creatively re-think the nature and format of presentations, and include presenters from beyond the confines of academia.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Religion

The twenty-first century has seen a revival of religion as a marker of gender difference in many parts of the globe.  Religious concepts and practices continue to be invoked to strengthen hierarchies, enforce conformity, and deny fundamental rights.  In light of those developments, submissions to Difficult Conversations on women, gender, and religion, are invited to reassess historical scholarship of the past decades that revealed competing theologies, and to question how, at this stage in history, scholars and activists may effectively advance more nuanced understandings of faith, religious systems, and the values associated with them.  Of particular interest are questions of gendered agency and authority in religion; religious “tradition” and identity; and the interplay between religion and sexuality.

Track Chairs:

  1. Performance Studies and Visual Culture

This track explores the ways in which performance and visual culture can create, interrogate, and reshape the meanings and representations of gender, sexuality, race, class, ability and other categories of identification.  Papers and presenters from any discipline that seeks to theorize and understand historical and contemporary modes of embodiment, agency, representation, and resistance are encouraged. Proposals may also incorporate short performances as a means of enhancing audience engagement with central questions about agency, representation and creation.  Presentations might use performance as an organizing framework for considering a wide range of gendered practices and relationships, including but not limited to: museums and memorials; landscapes and the built environment; food and consumption; technology and digital media; nationalism, totalitarianism, repression, and revolution; theatre and creative practices, literary production, and censorship.

Track Chairs:

  1. Politics and Popular Culture

The relationship between politics and popular culture is key to understanding women, gender, and sexualities across historical eras.  We invite submissions that critically engage the history of popular culture in any time period and locale.  Popular culture history has emerged as a vibrant field that yields new ways to study the intersections of race, gender, class, sexuality, and (dis)ability.  Submitters can take up a number of issues ranging from how and why popular culture is central to the quotidian experiences of people around the globe to its role in the shifting paradigms of feminism, body politics, critical race theory, trans studies, imperialism, transnational studies, and reproductive justice.  By centering on forms of popular cultural expression, including film, music, sports, dance, fashion, print media, social media, this track seeks to bring a diverse group of scholars, cultural producers, and practitioners into conversation with one another.

Track Chairs:

  1. Work Cultures/Work Realities: The Academy and Beyond

This track seeks individual papers, panels, or roundtable sessions on issues or themes relevant to the work we (broadly defined) do. We hope to generate informed conversation about pedagogy, but also working conditions—for those working in any capacity in higher educational institutions as well as those in other settings.  Given the service burdens in the academy that fall particularly heavily on women and people of color, how do we see that such contributions are valued?  Do we need to redefine teaching and service as intellectual endeavors?  Is it necessary to change dominant understandings of scholarship?  How would we set about doing these tasks?  These issues are particularly timely given attacks on university employees and the questions raised by politicians, parents, and students about the “value” or “utility” of history?  They are also important in light of those scholars, including public historians, public intellectuals, and digital humanists whose contributions often cannot be measured by “traditional” categories.  Other difficult conversations are to be had on how historians in various settings (schools, universities, non-profits, for-hire) can work together? We also seek to address how scholarship and work are married beyond the academy.  Can one still be a historian and work, for example, in non-academic settings.  What does it mean to be an Alt-Ac, public historian or history informed activist in 2017?

Track Chairs:

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Gender, Work, and Organization, 8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference

Appel à communications:

 

Gender, Work and Organization

8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference

24th – 26th June, 2014, Keele University, UK

 

As a central theme in social science research in the field of work and organisation, the study of gender has achieved contemporary significance beyond the confines of early discussions of women at work. Launched in 1994, Gender, Work and Organization was the first journal to provide an arena dedicated to debate and analysis of gender relations, the organisation of gender and the gendering of organisations. The Gender, Work and Organization conference provides an international forum for debate and analysis of a variety of issues in relation to gender studies. The 2012 conference at Keele University attracted approximately 380 international scholars from over 30 nations. The Conference will be held at Keele University, Staffordshire, in Central England, the UK’s largest integrated campus university.

Visit Keele Hall Info pdf at: http://www.keele-conference.com/2/keele-hall The University occupies a 617 acre campus site with Grade II registration by English Heritage and has good road and rail access. Many architectural and landscape features dating from the 19th century are of regional significance. International travellers are served by Manchester and Birmingham airports. On campus accommodation caters for up to 100,000 visitors per year in day and residential conferences.

 

Conference Organisers: Deborah Kerfoot (Keele University, UK) d.kerfoot@keele.ac.uk

Ida Sabelis (Vrije University, NETHERLANDS)

Conference Administrator Nicola Nixon at: gwo@keele.ac.uk

International travellers are served by Manchester and Birmingham airports. On campus accommodation caters for up to 100,000 visitors per year in day and residential conferences.

Travel and transport: http://www.keele-conference.com/21/directions

Conference venue: http://www.keele-conference.com/2/keele-hall

University campus information: http://www.keele-conference.com/21/directions (follow pdf link)

Conference package fee: booking form for GWO2014 (conference, meals and 2 nights en-suite accommodation) and discounted `early-bird’ rate, forthcoming on `News and Announcements’ section of our website http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-0432

Sample accommodation information: http://www.keele-conference.com/5/accommodation and

http://www.keele-conference.com/125/accommodation-picture-gallery

 

Submit your abstract direct to one of the streams listed here. Most are due November 1, 2013. (http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/58518/GWO2014_Call_for_abstracts_all%20streams_1.pdf)

 

 

We look forward to welcoming you in person to GWO2014!

Deborah Kerfoot and Ida Sabelis,

Gender, Work & Organization.

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à Articles: Lilith: A Feminist History Journal

Appel à Articles (Call for Papers)

Lilith: A Feminist History Journal

http://www.lilithjournal.org.au/?page_id=53

Le journal Lilith encourage spécialement les soumissions des doctorant-e-s internationaux en l’histoire du genre, l’histoire des femmes, et l’histoire des féminismes.

“The recently revived Lilith: A Feminist History Journal is seeking submissions for our next issue.

First published in 1984, Lilith is a peer-reviewed journal which publishes articles and reviews in all areas of women’s, feminist and gender history (not limited to Australia). It is a valuable forum for both new and established scholars in the field. We particularly encourage submissions from Australian and international postgraduate students and early career researchers.

Submissions for the 2014 issue must be received by 1 September 2013.”

Enquiries to: lilithjournal@gmail.com

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel de Communications, Berkshire Conference on Women’s History: Histories on the Edge/Histoires sur la brèche

 APPEL A COMMUNICATIONS

«Berkshire Conference on Women’s History»
Histories on the Edge/Histoires sur la brèche

Toronto: du 22 au 25 mai 2014  

Envoi des propositions: avant le 15 janvier 2013

http://berksconference.org/meetings/reminder-and-submission-site-for-2014-big-berks-is-up-and-running/

Cliquez ici pour accéder au Site des soumissions!

La description du site:

La seizième «Berkshire Conference on Women’s History» se tiendra à Toronto du 22 au 25 mai 2014. L’Université de Toronto accueillera la première «Big Berks» canadienne en collaboration avec des unités et universités co-marraines de Toronto et de l’ensemble du Canada.

Notre thème principal, Histories on the Edge/Histoires sur la brèche, illustre l’internationalisation croissante de la «Berkshire Conference». Il reconnaît également la précarité d’un monde où des millions de personnes marginalisées exigent des changements et où des intellectuelles et des intellectuels innovateurs créent des brèches et tissent des liens à l’intérieur comme à l’extérieur du monde universitaire. Le congrès organisé au Canada entend susciter un engagement afin de multiplier les brèches conceptuelles, en affinant, décentrant et décolonisant les histoires. Les brèches ont un caractère spatial – frontières impénétrables, enveloppes étouffantes ou protectrices, et points d’entrée fluides. Elles ont aussi une dimension temporelle, évoquant également la créativité et l’avant-garde. Ce concept suggère en outre un enchevêtrement de confrontations brutales, de conflits déchirants mais aussi d’échanges intimes. Il évoque les espaces alternatifs que se sont construits les personnes et populations «marginalisées» ainsi que les efforts déployés pour créer un espace commun où bâtir des histoires à caractère oppositionnel.

État-nation façonné par des récits historiques impérialistes et sa propre dynamique colonialiste, le Canada est lui-même en marge d’un empire américain très puissant, bien que peut-être en déclin. Comme d’autres sociétés investies par les Blancs, c’est un État colonial fondé sur la dépossession de Premières nations, sur une citoyenneté blanche aux marges policées et sur l’imposition de modèles patriarcaux d’assimilation. Son histoire s’est néanmoins déployée de façon très diverse selon le temps et l’espace et en suscitant une myriade de résistances. Vécue sur les marges de trois empires, la trajectoire historique du Canada comprend une première colonisation française, toujours vivante dans la présence francophone au pays, puis celle des Britanniques. Les signes distinctifs du pays comprennent aujourd’hui un système de santé public, le droit au mariage entre personnes de même sexe et un multiculturalisme officiel, même si contesté. La ville de Toronto, située en territoire Anishinabe, est un lieu créatif, cosmopolite et un foyer de contestation, qui est à la fois un «chez-soi» et un «ailleurs» pour bon nombre de ses résidentes et résidents. Quel meilleur endroit où examiner marges et brèches comme porteuses d’espoir, d’enthousiasme et de possibles, mais également de danger, de déplacement, de lutte et d’exil?

 Comme elles sont souvent les moteurs de changements, aussi lents, douloureux ou partiels soient-ils, nous sommes à l’affût d’histoires vécues «sur la brèche» partout et de toutes les époques. Nous voulons particulièrement faire place aux histoires des Caraïbes et de l’Amérique latine, de l’Asie et du Pacifique, de l’Afrique et du Moyen-Orient, ainsi qu’aux cultures indigènes, francophones et à celles des diasporas du monde entier. Nous faisons appel aux présentations qui font place à des corps et à des objets qui font brèche d’une manière ou d’une autre. Notre thème invite également les travaux qui soumettent à l’épreuve du queer les binarités de genre et de sexe. Comment historiciser l’émergence, les traces ou la persistance de constructions sociales de genre comme le «masculin» et le «féminin», ainsi que la performativité du genre, les pratiques sexuelles et les identifications sociales qui contestent les modes binaires du genre et de la sexualité?

Notre thème incite à la réflexion critique sur les nombreux modes d’opération du genre. Celui-ci présente son lot de brèches irrégulières: là où les sphères privées et publiques, et les masculinités et féminités, ont été définies et redéfinies; là où la classe, le genre, la race, l’ethnicité, la nation, la parenté, la sexualité et les in/capacités ont interagi. Le genre comme concept sera donc lui aussi sur la brèche: il faut le débattre et le passer au crible pour en exposer les usages, les contradictions, les atouts et les limites.

Ce thème central de la brèche tient compte de la théorie et de la praxis féministes qui favorisent des questionnements constants. Nous sommes en quête de travaux sur les formes du féminisme occidental et des féminismes non occidentaux et invitons à l’étude des féminismes dans le contexte sans cesse mouvant des rapports de pouvoir et des alignements internationaux. Le congrès interroge la possibilité d’une revitalisation de l’esprit critique du féminisme dominant. Devrions-nous, comme universitaires et quelle que soit notre position, chercher à ébranler le centre au profit de la marge? Affûter nos critiques d’un monde qui, aujourd’hui comme si souvent dans le passé, semble être au bord du gouffre?

Nous encourageons la mise sur pied de panels thématiques comparatifs ou transnationaux, même dans le cas de sous-thèmes plus régionaux. Un appel tout particulier est lancé aux chercheures et chercheurs dont les analyses traversent les siècles, les cultures, les lieux et les générations.

Les propositions seront approuvées par des sous-comités transnationaux de spécialistes de champs thématiques particuliers. Chaque proposition doit être rattachée à UN des sous-thèmes et être soumise par voie électronique. En rédigeant votre proposition à l’intention d’un des sous-comités, vous n’avez PAS à aborder chaque élément du thème en question. Veuillez aussi indiquer un deuxième choix de sous-thème, mais n’adressez pas votre proposition à plus d’un sous-comité

La préférence sera accordée aux discussions de tout sujet dépassant les frontières nationales, y compris pour les sous-thèmes régionaux, avec une considération spéciale pour les périodes pré-modernes (histoire ancienne, médiévale et Temps Modernes). Cependant, les articles individuels et les propositions consacrées à un seul pays ou à une seule région auront aussi droit à une entière considération. À titre de forum voué à encourager des recherches innovatrices et transdisciplinaires et des échanges transnationaux, nous faisons appel aux propositions d’étudiantes et d’étudiants diplômés, de spécialistes d’envergure internationale et autonomes, de cinéastes, de pédagogues, de conservatrices et de conservateurs, d’artistes, d’activistes, et nous voulons accueillir une riche gamme de perspectives.

 La personne qui soumet un article ou organise un panel, une table ronde ou un atelier est celle responsable de soumettre l’ensemble des éléments de cette proposition.

Types de séances (pour soumettre une proposition, vous vous identifierez comme « Auteur‑e » sur le site des soumissions)

 Articles individuels: Le fichier soumis doit inclure votre nom, le titre de l’article et un résumé d’au plus 250 mots. Veuillez soumettre également un bref c.v. (une demi-page).

Panels: Trois présentations d’articles (de 20 minutes chacune, ainsi que les noms d’un-e président-e et d’une commentatrice ou commentateur distinct. (Nous étudierons également les propositions de 2 ou 4 articles.) Le fichier soumis doit inclure le nom de l’auteur-e, le titre et un résumé de 250 mots pour chaque article, ainsi qu’un titre pour le panel, son résumé en 500 mots et le nom de l’organisatrice ou organisateur. Veuillez également soumettre un bref c.v. (une demi-page) pour chaque participant-e.

Tables rondes: De quatre à six présentatrices ou présentateurs et un-e président-e qui peut aussi agir comme modératrice ou modérateur. L’objectif visé est un échange de type collégial au sein du groupe et avec l’auditoire. Le fichier soumis doit inclure le titre de la table ronde, le nom de l’organisateur ou organisatrice, un résumé de 500 mots et la liste des participant-es, accompagnée d’une brève description de leur contribution à l’échange. Veuillez soumettre un bref c.v. (une demi-page) pour chaque participant-e.

Ateliers: De six à neuf articles pré-diffusés, ainsi que les noms d’un-e président-e et d’un-e discutant-e distinct-e. (Nous considérerons jusqu’à 10 articles.) Les articles devront être déposés avant le 30 avril 2014 et seront pré-diffusés par affichage sur un site Web accessible à toutes les personnes inscrites à la conférence. Le fichier soumis doit inclure le titre, le nom de l’auteur-e et un résumé de 250 mots pour chaque article, ainsi qu’un titre pour l’atelier, le nom de l’organisatrice ou organisateur et un résumé de 500 mots. Veuillez soumettre un bref c.v. (une demi-page) pour chaque participant-e. L’auditoire et les participant-es se livreront à une conversation thématique.)

Adressez votre soumission à UN des sous-thèmes (appelés « Sections » sur le site des soumissions)

*Frontières, rencontres, régions frontalières, zones de conflit et mémoire

*Empires, pays et bien commun

*Droit, enchevêtrements familiaux, tribunaux, criminalité et prisons

*Corps, santé, technologies médicales et sciences

*Histoires indigènes et mondes indigènes

*Caraïbes, Amérique latine et mondes afro/francophones

*Asie, circuits transnationaux et diasporas mondiales

*Économies, environnements, travail et consommation

*Sexualités, genres/LGBTIQ2 et intimités

*Politiques, religions/croyances et féminismes

*Cultures visuelles, matérielles et médiatiques: imprimé, image, objet, son, performance

Cliquez ici pour accéder au Site des soumissions!

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Call for Papers: Gender in the European Town: Medieval to Modern

CALL FOR PAPERS

GENDER IN THE EUROPEAN TOWN: Medieval to Modern

University of Southern Denmark, Odense,

22-25 May 2013

From the organizers:

« As places which fostered and disseminated key social, economic, political and cultural developments, historically towns have been central to the creation of gendered identities and the transmission of ideas across local, national and transnational boundaries.

The Gender in the European Town Network invites proposals for papers of 20 minutes, completed panels (3 papers, chair and commentator) and poster sessions.

The Conference will be organised in three main strands. We encourage papers that address one of the strands, or proposals that cross the theme boundaries. They should also explore what influence gender has on the shape of towns themselves, as a force for change. We welcome local studies as well as more comparative approaches and encourage historiographical, theoretical and empirical considerations. »

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn