Archives du mot-clé Appel à communication

Appel à Communications: Women and Labour Activism in a Transnational Context

Appel à Communications: Women and Labour Activism in a Transnational Context

International Symposium

Newcastle University, 15-16 April 2016

In her 2014 work, Writing History in the Global Era, Lynn Hunt asks if globalization really is the new theory that will invigorate history. Since ‘the global turn’ it remains to be seen if more opportunities have been created to explore ways of including women in political, social and cultural history and in particular that of Labour history.

In order to investigate the impact of transnationalism on the visibility of women’s activism in the past, Claudia Baldoli and Máire Cross would like to invite proposals for research papers to be presented in an international conference that will bring together research groups of the North east including North East Labour History, Newcastle and Northumbria Universities Labour and Society Research Group, Newcastle University Gender Research Group.

Transnational approaches to the history of women in labour activism:

From Mary Wollstonecraft to 2014 Nobel Peace winner Malala Yousafzai: this two-day conference aims to discuss the effect of transnational approaches and the current polemical issues of the field, and to promote findings in new research on women’s engagement from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century, from individual to collective movements, in specific revolutionary moments and over several generations, in local and international associations, in particular where Labour activism intersects with other political, religious and cultural aspects of women’s activism.

 

Possible topics include: Women and strikes; Women in political movements, trades unions and NGOs; Women and political violence; Relationship between different generations of women activists; Pacifist women; Women involved in resistance movements; Women activists in exile; Biographical approaches to women activists; Political transitions in a life time of activism (for example in relation to peace and war, internationalism and nationalism, socialism and fascism, anti-colonialism and independence); Women activists in religious-social movements; Images of Women and Labour in cultural production; Women activists as writers, film makers, reporters.

We are interested in women’s roles as both political activists and intellectuals across borders and generations; on women’s biographies, both of lone women activists and of collective groups, of key figures as well as obscure ones, and on the role of biographies in establishing activist women’s reputations. We also welcome reflections on the methodology of activism and on problems inherent to the use of archives. We are keen to include researchers at all stages of their career. There may be limited funding to assist postgraduates whose papers are accepted.

Our invited keynote speaker is Susan Zimmermann, University Professor, Central European University, Budapest, specialist of international gender politics, labour women’s transnational activism, women’s work, and the ILO (http://people.ceu.edu/susan_zimmermann).

Please submit a 200 word proposal and CV by 31 January 2015 to:

EITHER Dr Claudia Baldoli, Senior Lecturer in European History, claudia.baldoli@ncl.ac.uk

OR Professor Máire Cross, Head of French, m.f.cross@ncl.ac.uk

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Appel à communications: Seventeenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities

Call for Papers

Difficult Conversations: Thinking and Talking about Women,
Genders, and Sexualities Inside and Outside the Academy
at Hofstra University, Hempstead NY
June 1-4, 2017

The deadline for submission of proposals for individual papers, panels, and other sessions is January 15, 2016.  All proposals must be submitted electronically via the Berkshire Conference website. (http://2017berkshireconference.hofstra.edu/call-for-papers/#instructions). This site will be available for submissions from August 1, 2015 to January 15, 2016. As part of the submission process, you will be asked to select the Theme Track, or subject area, in which you would like your proposal considered. Your proposal will then be forwarded to the appropriate Track Chair.

Themed Tracks

From those listed below, please identify the subject area in which you wish to have your proposal considered. Note: Several divisions include suggested themes for exploration. These suggestions do not preclude proposals on other topics.  Questions about tracks should be directed to track co-chairs.

  1. Gender and the State: Majorities and Minorities

The state is present in gendered debates on the rights and obligations of citizenship, the provision of social welfare, governance and control, hierarchy and fealty, discrimination and marginalization. State power and also state violence are expressed differentially according to gender, with reference to legal status, reproductive rights, marriage, death, and an individual’s inclusion in the polity. Proposals might explore some of the following questions: How are gendered experiences and identities shaped by the state, and how do the demands of sexual, racial, ethnic, religious, and indigenous minorities shape state practices and institutions? How does power circulate between majorities and minorities, and how is difference, subordination, and subjecthood produced by the state, and also challenged by non-dominant communities? Specific examples might also refer to legal equality and legal status; struggles for suffrage; reproductive, human, and migrant rights; and the regulation of gendered forms of labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Social Justice, Migration and the City

Cities – as spatial forms, economic entities, and human habitats – are dynamic hubs where identity, social relations, power, inequality, and social change are visible and contested in the natural, built, and human environment, in memories and artifacts of the past, and the present. Movements of people searching for better lives and for greater opportunities, fleeing persecution and violence, or just escaping the confines of their previous lives, often end up in cities. Whether segregated or intermingled, people from different regions and different parts of the world negotiate space and identity, fight for justice and create change. We invite proposals from historians and interdisciplinary scholars working on different geographical areas, or transnationally, that explore some aspect of the historical role that migrants, migration and urban space have played in advancing both inequality and freedom, in incubating struggles for social justice and change.

Proposals in this track are encouraged to consider the following questions: how migration and mobility have impacted economic, social, cultural and political relations and formations; how the city as a spatial form influences perceptions about poverty and wealth, citizenship, social control and the nation of freedom; how global forces, markets and privatization create and/or shape urban spaces and people’s lives; how inequalities manifest in urban spaces and through institutions such as housing, employment, and education; how cities shape notions of community and belonging, identity, access and exclusion; and how urban (suburban and ex-urban) environments structure organizing, grassroots activism and social justice agendas

Track Chairs:

  1. Globalized Labor

Examining women’s labor from a global perspective offers many possibilities to consider historical specificity, women’s migration, political involvement, and transnational social movements, as well as the multiple ways in which women’s labor shapes and is shaped by broader political and economic processes. It also examines how women’s labor has defined global circuits, labor demands, and transnational labor, especially in regards to intimate labor, care-giving, outsourcing life (surrogacy), lack of documentation, and informal economies.  By the same token, we are interested in papers that look at how women have organized to challenge women’s disenfranchisement and oppression within globalized systems of labor and production.

We invite proposals from historians of different geographical areas, transnational scholars, as well as activists that address the following areas: women and transatlantic/transpacific migration; trafficking and forced labor; neoliberalism and labor migration; subcontracted labor; guest workers; the informal sector; women entrepreneurs; the gender pay gap; women’s labor and climate change; segregated labor markets; international labor organizing; women’s labor and social reproduction; transnational families and women’s work; surrogate motherhood and transnational adoption; women’s labor and free trade policy; the wages for housework movement; working class/labor movements; transnational social movements; the International Labour Organization (ILO) and women’s labor; labor legislation/protective legislation and women workers.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

  4. Slavery and Other Forms of Unfree Labor

We invite historians, activists, and others who are interested in examining how systems of unfree labor shaped lived experiences in “free” and “unfree” societies from ancient times to the twenty-first century. Slavery configured the geographic landscape of all who came into contact with it and connected societies economically, especially as global capitalism developed rapidly.  As a result of slavery’s commodification, systems of inequality were established that still linger.  We hope that the panel presentations offered will provide deep analyses of slavery, push forward new methodological approaches, broaden historiographical borders that have surrounded the subject, and advance new questions about the historical legacies of unfree labor.  We are especially interested in receiving proposals that emphasize the gendered dimensions of slavery and unfree labor in comparative frameworks temporally and spatially, from the ancient world to the 21st century. Papers might include analyses of slave systems that connected societies across the Atlantic, Pacific or Indian oceans, trans-Saharan slavery, convict labor, sexual (including marriage) and debt slavery, or other institutions of bonded labor.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Capitalism

With the recent, renewed interest in the history of capitalism, we seek to open up a conversation that deepens our understanding of capitalism and its diverse role in the transformation of economies and societies across the globe.  We are particularly interested in proposals that consider how the study of women and gender can help us better understand global capitalism as an internally differentiated and interconnected, shared structure.  Proposals that join an innovative use of both quantitative and qualitative methods and evidence will be given special consideration, as will those that incorporate how historians, activists, artists, economists and others have engaged with the histories of capitalism.  We invite submissions on topics as diverse as corporate capitalism, the service economy, markets and consumption, business, the environment and development, social networks, globalization and antiglobalization, and big data.

Track chairs:

  1. Sexualities, Gender Identities and Expressions

We call for proposals that consider the question of how sex, sexualities and gender are managed and maintained across boundaries of race, class, and culture  (among others). New paths of contestation engaging the fluidity of genders and sexualities are called for in the current state of emergency surrounding issues of anti-Black racism and police brutality that have generated public protest in the United States.  Similarly, popular and state uprisings across the Middle East and North Africa (among others), have destabilized conventional hierarchies. How might these conflicts generate new models of activism, scholarship, and praxis along axes of gender identity, expression, and sexualities?  How do emergent gender identities and sexual expressions produce both antagonisms and possibilities? Papers that concern historically situated race and racism and local and transnational state violence are particularly relevant.  The Sexualities and Gender Identities and Expressions track will also consider but not be limited to: queer pedagogies; reproductive technologies and sexualities; relations among Feminist Studies/LGBTQ Studies/ Queer Studies; police states and violence; intimate partner violence; social protest; pleasure and sexual practices; trans*/national movements and movement building; political coalitions; dangerous intimacies.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

7. Women, Gender and Science

The Program Committee welcomes proposals for panels, papers, round-table discussions, or other presentations on all aspects of the history of women, gender(s), and science (including medicine and technology). We are particularly interested in creating a program that includes a range of geographic areas, historical periods, and methodologies. We welcome proposals that are interdisciplinary and intersectional, and that represent a diverse set of voices within academia and beyond including, but not limited to, those that engage visual and performing arts, science fiction, civic science, do-it-yourself experiments, computing and the Maker Movement. We especially encourage panel proposals that bring together scholars, artists, and/or practitioners around a common theme.

Track Chairs:

  1. Pedagogy and Work Culture, K-12

The Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Genders, and Sexualities brings together thousands of historians, activists, educators, and artists to share their research and activism. The 2017 conference especially wants to involve teachers and teacher educators in a lively discussion of teachers’ work as well as curriculum, pedagogy, and the history of education informed by feminist, queer, Marxist, and race-based theory. We plan to partner teachers and teacher educators with academics, school activists, museum educators, librarians, and artists to explore gender and sexuality in school curricula and the life of schools and those who work there. A range of creative presentation formats—including performance-based, digital, and open forum—are encouraged.  Possible topics include:  How genders and sexuality are taught (or not taught) in the curriculum in the era of high stakes testing; Engaging social issues in K-12 curriculum (e.g., peace, suffrage, temperance, anti-lynching) that illuminate and enrich the understanding of a particular era or movement;  The gendered nature of the attack on public education, the history of women in the schools, and teacher union history; Gender and the work of teachers, including oral histories of closeted and “out” queer educators.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and War

War, as a time of dramatic rupture and change, can bring terrible suffering but also, potentially, opportunity. Wars serve to construct, fracture and challenge gender identities and gendered hierarchies. Gender, moreover, has been a mobilizing theme for both anti-war and militaristic movements. We invite innovative contributions that address topics such as the gendered dimensions of both home fronts and battle fronts; the intersections of gender, ethnicity and religious identification in war contexts; the ways that different genders and sexualities are negotiated within wartime regimes; the intersections of war, gender, science and technology; the gendered dimensions of war memory, memorialization and mourning; the gendering of wartime discourse and propaganda; and media, literary and visual representations of gender, war and conflict. Submissions may deal with any geographical area(s) and any historical era, from ancient to modern.

Track Chairs:

Top of page

10. Refugees, Asylum and Gender

Gender and sexuality have shaped the flow of people fleeing war persecution, man-made and natural catastrophes, playing a strong role not only in who flees, but also in what they experience. Additionally, as a form of forced migration, refugee migration invites juxtaposition with detention and deportation, international adoption, and human trafficking.  Thus we invite path breaking contributions that address the experiences of such coerced migrants in various  times and places, focusing on such topics as sustaining everyday life in refugee camps and in resettlement, gendered persecution (such as intimate partner violence, forced marriage, or rape) in asylum cases, gendered treatment of refugees, gendered effects of refugee and asylum policies, the gendered discourse of refugees and asylum, gendered forms of resilience and creativity,  the intersection of gender/race/culture/ability and sexuality and historic and ongoing inequity as a factor in forced migration. We especially welcome proposals that cross boundaries, creatively re-think the nature and format of presentations, and include presenters from beyond the confines of academia.

Track Chairs:

  1. Women, Gender and Religion

The twenty-first century has seen a revival of religion as a marker of gender difference in many parts of the globe.  Religious concepts and practices continue to be invoked to strengthen hierarchies, enforce conformity, and deny fundamental rights.  In light of those developments, submissions to Difficult Conversations on women, gender, and religion, are invited to reassess historical scholarship of the past decades that revealed competing theologies, and to question how, at this stage in history, scholars and activists may effectively advance more nuanced understandings of faith, religious systems, and the values associated with them.  Of particular interest are questions of gendered agency and authority in religion; religious “tradition” and identity; and the interplay between religion and sexuality.

Track Chairs:

  1. Performance Studies and Visual Culture

This track explores the ways in which performance and visual culture can create, interrogate, and reshape the meanings and representations of gender, sexuality, race, class, ability and other categories of identification.  Papers and presenters from any discipline that seeks to theorize and understand historical and contemporary modes of embodiment, agency, representation, and resistance are encouraged. Proposals may also incorporate short performances as a means of enhancing audience engagement with central questions about agency, representation and creation.  Presentations might use performance as an organizing framework for considering a wide range of gendered practices and relationships, including but not limited to: museums and memorials; landscapes and the built environment; food and consumption; technology and digital media; nationalism, totalitarianism, repression, and revolution; theatre and creative practices, literary production, and censorship.

Track Chairs:

  1. Politics and Popular Culture

The relationship between politics and popular culture is key to understanding women, gender, and sexualities across historical eras.  We invite submissions that critically engage the history of popular culture in any time period and locale.  Popular culture history has emerged as a vibrant field that yields new ways to study the intersections of race, gender, class, sexuality, and (dis)ability.  Submitters can take up a number of issues ranging from how and why popular culture is central to the quotidian experiences of people around the globe to its role in the shifting paradigms of feminism, body politics, critical race theory, trans studies, imperialism, transnational studies, and reproductive justice.  By centering on forms of popular cultural expression, including film, music, sports, dance, fashion, print media, social media, this track seeks to bring a diverse group of scholars, cultural producers, and practitioners into conversation with one another.

Track Chairs:

  1. Work Cultures/Work Realities: The Academy and Beyond

This track seeks individual papers, panels, or roundtable sessions on issues or themes relevant to the work we (broadly defined) do. We hope to generate informed conversation about pedagogy, but also working conditions—for those working in any capacity in higher educational institutions as well as those in other settings.  Given the service burdens in the academy that fall particularly heavily on women and people of color, how do we see that such contributions are valued?  Do we need to redefine teaching and service as intellectual endeavors?  Is it necessary to change dominant understandings of scholarship?  How would we set about doing these tasks?  These issues are particularly timely given attacks on university employees and the questions raised by politicians, parents, and students about the “value” or “utility” of history?  They are also important in light of those scholars, including public historians, public intellectuals, and digital humanists whose contributions often cannot be measured by “traditional” categories.  Other difficult conversations are to be had on how historians in various settings (schools, universities, non-profits, for-hire) can work together? We also seek to address how scholarship and work are married beyond the academy.  Can one still be a historian and work, for example, in non-academic settings.  What does it mean to be an Alt-Ac, public historian or history informed activist in 2017?

Track Chairs:

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Séance d’affiches de la conférence Berkshire 2014 sur l’histoire des femmes: Histoires sur la brèche

Berks 2014

 

Appel à communications: Séance d’affiches de la conférence Berkshire 2014 sur l’histoire des femmes: Histoires sur la brèche
Toronto, du 22 au 25 mai 2014
Date d’échéance des propositions: le 29 novembre

http://berksconference.org/conference-blog/cfps-poster-session-2014-berkshire-conference-on-the-history-of-women/

Nous cherchons des propositions pour la séance d’affiches qui aura lieu lors de la conférence Berkshire 2014 sur l’histoire des femmes à l’Université de Toronto. Nous accueillerons des soumissions sur n’importe quel sujet, dans n’importe quelle discipline, du moment où elles concernent le thème plus général de la conférence, Histories on the Edge/Histoires sur la brèche.

La séance d’affiches vise à relier des chercheur(e)s de tous les domaines et disciplines et à leur fournir un espace dans lequel partager et discuter de leurs recherches en cours. Elle est aussi ouverte à d’autres présentations qui ne peuvent s’intégrer aisément dans un panel régulier, comme les work-in-progress, les projets reliés à des technologies et des expositions du format d’une table. Les étudiant(e)s de premier cycle, les étudiant(e)s diplômé(e)s, les chercheur(e)s non affiliés, et les personnes qui ne participent pas déjà au programme de la conférence sont vivement encouragées à postuler.

Les présentateurs-trices devront mettre en forme et imprimer leur propre affiche, qui ne doit pas dépasser le format de 36 po x 48 po. D’autres directives et informations seront fournies lors de la sélection.

Les soumissions pour la session d’affiches devraient inclure les éléments suivants :

– Un formulaire de demande dûment rempli (voir ci-dessous)
– Un résumé de 250 mots
– Un CV d’une page qui inclut votre nom, votre affiliation et vos coordonnées de contact
– Une maquette simple de l’affiche prévue

Veuillez envoyer votre demande et toute question à bcwhposter@utsc.utoronto.ca en un seul document .pdf  le ou avant le 29 novembre 2013.

La Seizième conférence Berkshire sur l’histoire des femmes qui se tiendra à Toronto du 22 au 25 mai 2014. L’Université de Toronto accueille ainsi la première «Big Berks» à avoir lieu au Canada, en collaboration avec des unités et des universités co-marraines de Toronto et de partout ailleurs au Canada.

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communications: Gender, Work, and Organization, 8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference

Appel à communications:

 

Gender, Work and Organization

8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference

24th – 26th June, 2014, Keele University, UK

 

As a central theme in social science research in the field of work and organisation, the study of gender has achieved contemporary significance beyond the confines of early discussions of women at work. Launched in 1994, Gender, Work and Organization was the first journal to provide an arena dedicated to debate and analysis of gender relations, the organisation of gender and the gendering of organisations. The Gender, Work and Organization conference provides an international forum for debate and analysis of a variety of issues in relation to gender studies. The 2012 conference at Keele University attracted approximately 380 international scholars from over 30 nations. The Conference will be held at Keele University, Staffordshire, in Central England, the UK’s largest integrated campus university.

Visit Keele Hall Info pdf at: http://www.keele-conference.com/2/keele-hall The University occupies a 617 acre campus site with Grade II registration by English Heritage and has good road and rail access. Many architectural and landscape features dating from the 19th century are of regional significance. International travellers are served by Manchester and Birmingham airports. On campus accommodation caters for up to 100,000 visitors per year in day and residential conferences.

 

Conference Organisers: Deborah Kerfoot (Keele University, UK) d.kerfoot@keele.ac.uk

Ida Sabelis (Vrije University, NETHERLANDS)

Conference Administrator Nicola Nixon at: gwo@keele.ac.uk

International travellers are served by Manchester and Birmingham airports. On campus accommodation caters for up to 100,000 visitors per year in day and residential conferences.

Travel and transport: http://www.keele-conference.com/21/directions

Conference venue: http://www.keele-conference.com/2/keele-hall

University campus information: http://www.keele-conference.com/21/directions (follow pdf link)

Conference package fee: booking form for GWO2014 (conference, meals and 2 nights en-suite accommodation) and discounted `early-bird’ rate, forthcoming on `News and Announcements’ section of our website http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1468-0432

Sample accommodation information: http://www.keele-conference.com/5/accommodation and

http://www.keele-conference.com/125/accommodation-picture-gallery

 

Submit your abstract direct to one of the streams listed here. Most are due November 1, 2013. (http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/58518/GWO2014_Call_for_abstracts_all%20streams_1.pdf)

 

 

We look forward to welcoming you in person to GWO2014!

Deborah Kerfoot and Ida Sabelis,

Gender, Work & Organization.

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communication: Social Science History Association Conference: “Organizing Powers”

Appel à communication: Social Science History Association Conference:

 “Organizing Powers”

Chicago, IL, USA

 November 21-24, 2013

Submission Deadline: 15 February 2013

Des organisatrices du réseau “Women, Gender, and Sexuality”:

“Please consider proposing panels that fit under the broad umbrella of our network women, gender & sexuality.  If you like more specific guidance, the general topic of the conference is « organizing powers » (see http://www.ssha.org/pdfs/SSHA_2013_CFP.pdf). In addition, topics raised at this year’s network meeting included:

Re-evaluating the sexual revolution from women, gender and sexuality perspectives; The organizing power of affect; The organizing power of color; The organizing powers of feminisms; Re-evaluating the socio-cultural effects of feminisms; Gendering and sexualization as structuring instruments of power; The relationship between feminism and revolution; Gender and labor organizing; Women and consumer activism; The Men’s movement; Re-organizing power relations; Gender organizing prison; LGBT, marriage: re-organizing power? Gender-segregation as organizing power; The relationship between household and state.

These are suggestions only – we are happy to consider all themes that fit within our network.

The deadline for submissions is February 15, 2013!  For instructions on how to upload panel and individual paper proposals please go to: http://www.ssha.org/conference-submission.”

SSHA

 

Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

Appel à communication – RT 24 de l’AFS « Genre, Classe, Race. Rapports sociaux et construction de l’altérité » – Nantes 2013

Le Ve congrès de l’Association Française de Sociologie se tiendra à l’Université de Nantes, en partenariat avec le Centre Nantais de Sociologie-CENS, du 2 au 5 septembre 2013.

Il s’organisera autour du thème: « Les Dominations ». Voir l’argumentaire ici.

Le Réseau Thématique 24 « Genre, Classe, Race. Rapports sociaux et construction de l’altérité » a lancé son appel à communication :

Le 5è Congrès de l’Association Française de Sociologie a pour thème : Les dominations. Le RT24 se réjouit de ce thème qui structure en profondeur l’activité du réseau depuis sa création. Notre appel s’appuie aussi sur les séminaires internes qui ont animé la vie du réseau depuis 2009 et au cours desquels nous avons réfléchi sur les concepts, la méthodologie et l’épistémologie de l’articulation des rapports sociaux. Enfin, notre appel entend prendre en compte la dynamique contestataire qui dénonce les rapports de domination – notamment de racisation – au sein des espaces universitaires, qu’ils soient féministes ou non, et y compris au sein du RT24.

La volonté de croiser l’analyse des dominations et une forme de réflexivité sur les dominations nous a conduit-e-s à proposer de consacrer une des sessions à la question suivante : Comment le racisme traverse-t-il les espaces universitaires en France ? Pour cette session, nous n’attendons pas tant des communications que des témoignages, des analyses, des propositions sur le problème pointé et les moyens de s’y attaquer.

Par ailleurs, pour les autres sessions, les propositions de communication devront s’inscrire dans une perspective qui tient compte de la co-formation des rapports sociaux de sexe, de classe et de race. Nous souhaitons développer la réflexion commune autour des questions suivantes : Comment la sociologie conceptualise-t-elle les diverses formes de domination (sexe, classe, race) ? Pouvons-nous analyser la complexité des diverses formes de domination avec les outils méthodologiques conventionnels ? Quels sont les apports de l’étude des rapports sociaux de sexe, classe et race à la sociologie ?

Pour ce faire, nous proposons 4 axes directeurs dans lesquels nous classerons les propositions de communications retenues. Quel que soit l’axe privilégié, nous attendons que les communications présentent les dispositifs méthodologiques mobilisés.

 

Axe 1. Travail et dominations

La domination qui s’exerce dans le travail revêt des formes multiples. Dans le cadre de cet axe, nous voudrions nous centrer sur la manière dont tant la naturalisation des compétences professionnelles dites féminines que le culturalisme sont mobilisés pour produire la division ethnique, sexuée et classée du travail productif et reproductif avec son cortège de discriminations et d’inégalités complexes.

Il s’agit non pas de décrire les inégalités et rapports de pouvoir mais d’analyser l’articulation entre les dimensions matérielles et symboliques, ces dernières présentant souvent un caractère d’évidence tant pour les employeurs que pour les salarié-es qui freinent leur dévoilement. Quels sont les modes de résistance des salarié-es à ces assignations ? Si les effets de la naturalisation ont été au cœur des travaux fondateurs du féminisme matérialiste et des recherches contemporaines sur le care, ceux du culturalisme ont été moins documentés dans les recherches féministes. Nous attendons des communications qui se focalisent sur les intrications entre ces deux dimensions – matérielle et symbolique – à partir d’une enquête de terrain, notamment dans les services marchands.

 

Axe 2. Domination, catégorisation et action collective

Depuis 6 ans, l’un des groupes de travail du RT 24 réfléchit sur les mouvements sociaux et les résistances. Pour ce Congrès, nous proposons d’orienter la réflexion dans trois directions.

1. Les rapports de domination suscitent des formes d’action collective visant à préserver ou contester les formes de domination. Par exemple, comment les rapports sociaux contribuent-ils à sélectionner les participant-e-s à une mobilisation ou encore les répertoires d’action collective (grèves, occupations, squats, manifestations, action syndicale, lobbies, recours au droit, etc.) ?

2. Les actions collectives rejouent les rapports de domination en leur sein. Par exemple, comment l’organisation du travail militant contribue-t-elle à (re)produire des frontières et hiérarchies sociales au sein d’une mobilisation ? Avec quelle conséquence sur les pratiques et trajectoires militantes ?

3. Par l’analyse des frontières sociales qui se reconfigurent dans les mobilisations, nous souhaitons approfondir la question de la catégorisation. L’action collective importe-t-elle un lexique catégoriel préexistant et/ou produit-elle, via l’actualisation des rapports de domination en son sein, un lexique catégoriel spécifique ? Quelle dialectique entre catégorisation et minorisation ? Entre catégorisation et segmentation des causes ? Entre catégorisation et résistance ?

Nous invitons ici les communications à interroger le travail sociologique de catégorisation. Comment les catégories utilisées pour donner à voir l’action des rapports sociaux sont-elles construites ? Comment déjouer les pièges de l’essentialisation ?

 

Axe 3. Homonormativité : (re)penser les normes à partir des « minorités » sexuelles

Dans une perspective critique des concepts d’hétéronormativité et d’hétérosocialité, nous souhaitons interroger ces modèles d’analyse dans le processus d’institutionnalisation des couples homosexuels qui se manifeste depuis les années 1990 à travers les revendications relatives au statut légal des couples de même sexe. Dans le contexte actuel, en France, les revendications pour le mariage (gay et lesbien) et celles relatives à la filiation sont devenues un enjeu politique qui peut être pensé à la fois comme un accès au droit pour tou-te-s selon un éthos universaliste, mais aussi comme un mouvement de normalisation à l’opposé des théories critiques des institutions selon une position revendiquée de marge en tant que pouvoir subversif.

Comment les normes hétéronormatives dominantes peuvent-elles rejoindre les normes homonormatives ? Par exemple, l’homoparentalité peut être saisie comme une injonction à la procréation qui pèse plus sur les lesbiennes que sur les gays, rejoignant ainsi l’injonction sociale à la maternité qui pèse sur toutes les femmes et soulève la question de la marchandisation des corps des femmes avec « la gestation pour autrui », l’un des modes d’homoparentalité revendiqué par certains gays. Enfin, l’homonormativité peut être saisie par l’analyse de l’injonction à la vérité sur soi (coming-out) dans une analyse croisée genre, classe, race et en lien avec l’homonationalisme qui met l’accent sur la construction de l’altérité ethnico-raciale au sein des « minorités » sexuelles.

 

Axe 4. Pratiques de la masculinité et domination

Dans la lignée des travaux féministes matérialistes ayant interrogé les hommes comme dominants, cet axe propose d’étudier les pratiques de la masculinité en tant qu’elles participent des rapports sociaux de sexe. En questionnant le renouvellement des manifestations sociales de la masculinité, il s’agit de penser l’articulation dynamique des structures matérielles d’oppression et des formations identitaires. Cette perspective liant les structures aux pratiques ouvre la voie à une convergence des approches matérialistes et des théories poststructuralistes dites postféministes. Si, dans un contexte de backlash antiféministe, l’étude de la masculinité requiert de placer au centre de l’analyse la question de la domination, il nous apparaît nécessaire de concilier celle-ci avec celle des masculinités subalternes et de leurs expressions sociales. Des subcultures sexuelles ayant vu émerger des masculinités féminines ou trans aux masculinités populaires et/ou racisées, quelles relations ces formes subalternes entretiennent-elles avec la « masculinité hégémonique » ? Quels types d’agencement des rapports sociaux de genre, classe, race soutiennent ces pratiques de la masculinité ? Quelles relations de dépendance ou d’autonomie ont-elles à l’égard du modèle hégémonique et de la domination ? Enfin, ces masculinités subalternes sont-elles à même de mettre à jour les mécanismes ordinaires de la domination masculine ?

 

Le RT24 tient à rappeler que la participation au Congrès suppose des frais d’inscription et d’adhésion à l’Association Française de Sociologie.

Les propositions de communication de 3000/4000 signes (bibliographie comprise)

sont à adresser d’ici le 15 janvier 2013 à l’adresse suivante :

rtgcr.afs@inv.univ-rouen.fr