Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History (Forum: Rethinking Key Concepts in Gender History)

Dernier numéro de la revue: Gender & History (Forum: Rethinking Key Concepts in Gender History)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gend.2016.28.issue-2/issuetoc

 

Volume 28, Issue 2, August 2016

 

Editorial

Editorial (pages 275–282)

Stuart Airlie, Maud Anne Bracke and Rosemary Elliot

 

Leonore Davidoff and the Founding of Gender & History (pages 283–287)

Jane Rendall and Keith McClelland

 

Blood, Contract and Intimacy: History and Practice with Leonore Davidoff (pages 288–298)

Megan Doolittle, Janet Fink and Katherine Holden

 

Forum: Rethinking Key Concepts in Gender History

Critical Thoughts on Keywords in Gender and History: An Introduction (pages 299–306)

Shireen Hassim

 

Gender Binary and the Limits of Poststructuralist Method (pages 307–323)

Anna Krylova

 

Historicising Agency (pages 324–339)

Lynn M. Thomas

 

‘Intersectionality’, Socialist Feminism and Contemporary Activism: Musings by a Second-Wave Socialist Feminist (pages 340–357)

Linda Gordon

 

Beyond ‘Crisis’ in Understanding Gender Transformation

Mary Louise Roberts

 

Degrading the Male Body: Manhood and Conflict in the High-medieval Low Countries (pages 367–386)

Stefan Meysman

 

Knightly Masculinity, Court Games and Material Culture in Late-medieval Portugal: The Case of Constable Afonso (c.1480–1504) (pages 387–400)

Hélder Carvalhal and Isabel dos Guimarães Sá

 

‘Poor Gordon’: What the Australian Cult of Adam Lindsay Gordon Tells Us About Turn-of-the-Twentieth-Century Masculine Sentimentality (pages 401–421)

Melissa Bellanta

 

Should we Abstain? Spousal Equality in Twelfth-century Byzantine Canon Law (pages 422–437)

Maroula Perisanidi

 

‘No More Fears, No More Tears’?: Gender, Emotion and the Aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars in France (pages 438–460)

Jennifer Heuer

 

Affection and Assimilation: Concubinage and the Ideal of Conjugal Love in Colonial Korea, 1922–38 (pages 461–479)

Sungyun Lim

 

‘Writing’ Black Womanhood in the Early Cuban Republic, 1904–16 (pages 480–500)

Takkara Brunson

 

Mourned Choices and Grievable Lives: The Anti-Abortion Movement’s Influence in Defining the Abortion Experience in Australia Since the 1960s (pages 501–519)

Erica Millar

 

Reviews

Anne-Marie Kilday, A History of Infanticide in Britain, c.1600 to the Present, (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), pp. 338. ISBN 978-0-230-54707-0 (hb). (pages 520–521)

 

Bronwen Neil and Lynda Garland (eds), Questions of Gender in Byzantine Society (Ashgate: Farnham, 2013), pp. x + 218. ISBN 978-1-4094-4779-5 (hb), 978-1-4094-4780-1 (ebook), 978-1-4094-7449-4 (ePUB). Judith Herrin, Unrivalled Influence: Women and Empire in Byzantium (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013), pp. xix + 328. ISBN 978-0-691-15321-6. (pages 522–526)

 

Philip Grace, Affectionate Authorities: Fathers and Fatherly Roles in Late Medieval Basel (Farnham: Ashgate, 2015), pp. x + 186. ISBN 978-1-4724-4554-4 (hb). (pages 527–528)

 

Darlene Abreu-Ferreira, Women, Crime, and Forgiveness in Early Modern Portugal (Burlington: Ashgate, 2015), pp. xii + 237. ISBN 978-1-47244-2314. (pages 529–530)

 

Gary Waller, A Cultural Study of Mary and the Annunciation: From Luke to the Enlightenment (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2015), pp. 256. ISBN 1-848-93575-7 (hb). (pages 531–532)

 

Helen McCarthy, Women of the World: The Rise of the Female Diplomat (London: Bloomsbury, 2014), pp. xii + 416. ISBN: 978-1-408-84004-7 (pb). (pages 533–534)

 

Josephine Hoegaerts, Masculinity and Nationhood, 1830–1910: Constructions of Identity and Citizenship in Belgium (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2014), pp. xii + 242. 978-1-137-39199-5 (hb). (pages 535–536)

 

Merrill D. Smith (ed.), Cultural Encyclopedia of the Breast (Lanham: Rownan and Littlefield, 2014), pp. xi + 288. ISBN 978-0-7591-2331-1 (hb); 978-0-7591-2332-8 (ebook). (pages 537–538)

 

Sarah B. Rodriguez, Female Circumcision and Clitoridectomy in the United States: A History of Medical Treatment (Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2014), pp. ix + 280. ISBN: 978-1-58046-498-7 (hb). (pages 539–540)

 

Marilyn Booth, Classes of Ladies of Cloistered Spaces: Writing Feminist History through Biography in Fin-de-Siècle Egypt (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015), pp. v + 466. ISBN 978-0-7486-9486-0 (hb); 978-1-4744-0341-2 (epub). (pages 541–542)

 

Maria Fritsche, Homemade Men in Postwar Austrian Cinema: Nationhood, Genre and Masculinity (New York: Berghahn, 2013), pp. xi + 274. ISBN 978-0-85745-945-9 (hb); ISBN 978-0-85745-945-6 (ebook). (pages 543–544)

 

Eileen J. Suárez Findlay, We Are Left without a Father Here: Masculinity, Domesticity, and Migration in Postwar Puerto Rico (Durham: Duke University Press, 2014), pp. xii + 300. ISBN 978-0-8223-5766-7 (hb); 978-0-8223-5782-7 (pb). (pages 545–546)

 

Marilyn Morris, Sex, Money & Personal Character in Eighteenth-Century British Politics (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014), pp. xiv + 257. ISBN 978-0-300-20845-0 (hb). (pages 547–548)

 

John H. Arnold and Sean Brady, What is Masculinity? Historical Dynamics from Antiquity to the Contemporary World (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), pp. v + 461. ISBN: 978-0-230-27813-4 (hb); 978-1-137-30560-2 (pb). (pages 549–550)

 

Tanya Fitzgerald and Elizabeth M. Smyth (eds), Women Educators, Leaders and Activists: Educational Lives and Networks, 1900–1960 (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), pp. v + 214. ISBN 978-1-137-30351-6 (hb). (pages 551–552)

 

Save

Save

Save


Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
LinkedIn

A propos Katie Jarvis

Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Je suis maître de conférences en histoire à l'University of Notre Dame. Mes recherches portent sur des marchandes parisiennes qui s’appellent les Dames des Halles pendant la Révolution française. En les utilisant comme un prisme, je demande comment les révolutionnaires ont négocié la double croissance des aspirations démocratiques et le capitalisme à travers leur métier quotidien. J’examine la façon dont les Dames ont inventé une notion de citoyenneté naissante qui a eu le travail, plutôt que le sexe, comme la base. En même temps, j'analyse comment les révolutionnaires ont débattu le rôle politique des classes populaires par les marchandes en détail. La nation française - et une grande partie de l'Europe – s’accapareraient dans ces problèmes pour des décennies.

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *